Maine Land Grants and Deeds

a project of
V. F. Thomas Co. - P. O. Box 111 - Shawmut, Maine  04975
info@vfthomas.com


(updated 19 November 2021)

Welcome to the Maine Land Grants and Deeds website.

The purpose of this website is to post the earliest land grants and deeds located for a town, but also later deeds as they become available.

How to use this website: The history of land grants, patents, and deeds for Maine is given below. At the point when a particular town is referenced, a link to that town is given. Following the link will take you to the land history for that town.

You can help by e-mailing scanned images or photocopies of deeds to info@vfthomas.com or by traditional mail to the address at the top of this page.

A little work by each of us will save a lot of work for all of us.





“At the same time as European venturers explored and mapped the eastern seaboard, the great powers of England and France laid claim to vast areas of the continent. These claims were authorized by the English and French crowns without any consultation with the Native peoples who actually inhabited the eastern seaboard.” [Source: Hornsby, Steven J., and Richard W. Judd, editors; Herman, Michael J., cartographic designer. 2015. Historical Atlas of Maine. Orono: The University of Maine Press. Part I, Plate 8, left page.]


1497
   Italian explorer Giovani Caboti, sailing for England as John Cabot with a crew of 18 men on the Matthew, “discovered” North America (Newfoundland).

1584
   Elizabeth I, Queen of England, granted to Sir Walter Raleigh much of the eastern seabord, which he named Virginia. [see 1604 below]

1603 November 8
   Henry IV, King of France, granted to Pierre de Gast, Sieur de Monts, the area between 40° and 46° north latitude. [see 1664 below]

1604
   Sir Walter Raleigh’s grant lapsed. [see 1584 above]

1606
   James I, King of England, granted to the Virginia Company (based in London and Plymouth in England) land between 34° and 46° north latitude. The London-based company held rights to the southern part of this grant; the Plymouth-based company, to the northern part.
   The northern/Plymouth company made four unsuccessful attempts at permanently settling the land they were granted: 1607–1608 (Popham colony), 1616–1617 (Winter Harbor), 1621– (Monhegan), and 1625–1675 (Pemaquid).

1607
   Georgetown settled. [see 1716 June 13 below]

1607 May 31–1608 September
   Popham Colony - 2 ships and 108 men under Captain George Popham as President and Captain Raleigh Gilbert as Admiral.
      1607 May 31 - sailed from Plymouth, England.
      1607 August 11 - reached Monhegan Island.
      1607 August [day?] - continued to mouth of Kennebec River, where they settled at what is today Hunnewell’s Point in the town of Phippsburg.
      1607 fall [and winter?] - built Fort St. George. Today Fort Popham stands on the site.
      1607–1608 winter - Captain George Popham died; Captain Raleigh Gilbert’s brother died, requiring Gilbert to return to England.
      1608 [date?] - ship [name?] arrived bringing supplies, but returned to England with remaining members of the colony.

1620 November 3
   James I, King of England, granted to the 40-person Council for New England, the successor to the Plymouth-based company, a new charter, for the land between 40° and 48° north latitude. [see 1604 above and 1621 below]

1621
   The Council for New England consented to James I’s subsequent granting of the northeastern portion of his 1620 grant, to Sir William Alexander. This area, extended from Cape Sable to the St. Lawrence River. [see 1620 November 3 above]

1622 August 10
   The Council for New England granted to Sir Ferdinando Gorges and Captain John Mason the area between the Merrimack River and Sagadahoc River [now Kennebec River], and extending from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River, land initially called the Province of Laconia. [see 1630 below]

1623
   Kittery settled. [see 1647 October 20 below]

1623
   [Saco] settled. [see 1762 June 15 below]

1624
   York settled. [see 1652 November 22 below]

1625
   Arrowsic settled. [see 1841 March 2 below]

1629
   The Council for New England divided the Province of Maine between Capt. John Mason, who received the area from the Piscataqua River south to the Merrimack River, and Sir Ferdinando Gorges, who received the area from the Piscataqua River north to the Kennebec River.

1629
   Cape-Porpus [sic; now Kennebunkport] settled. [see 1653 July 5 below]

1629 February 12 (old style) = 1 February 1630 (new style)
   Council of Plymouth [Council of New England?] granted to Thomas Lewis and Capt. Richard Bonython land [now Saco] along the east side of the Saco River, four miles along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, and eight miles inland, and to John Oldham and Richard Vines land [now Biddeford] along the west side of the Saco River, four miles along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, and eight miles inland.

1630 [month/day?]
   Biddeford settled. [see 1653 July 5 below]

1630 [month/day?]
   Scarborough settled. [see 1658 July 14 below]

1630 [month/day?]
   Sir Ferdinando Gorges and Captain John Mason obtained a new patent to their land. [see 1622 August 10 above and 1635 April 18 below]

1630 [month/day?]
   Council of Plymouth granted to John Dye and others a tract 40 miles square between Cape Porpoise and Cape Elizabeth. This was known as the Plough Patent.

1630
   Cape Elizabeth settled. [see 1765 November 1 below]

1630 March 13
   A grant was made [by ?] to John Beauchamp (of London) and Thomas Leverett (of Boston) of a 10-league-square parcel between Muscongus, Broad Bay, and Penobscot Bay, originally called the Lincoln Grant and later the Waldo Patent.

1631
   Old Orchard Beach [then part of Saco] settled. [see 1883 February 20 below]

1631 November 1
   Council of Plymouth granted to Thomas Cammock land from Black Point River to the Spurwink River, and for a distance of one mile from the ocean.

1632
   Falmouth settled. [see 1658 July 14 below]

1632 June 16
   Council of Plymouth granted a patent to Thomas Purchase and George Way for land on both sides of the Androscoggin River from its mouth, in Merrymeeting Bay, to indefinite northern limits. [see 1683 below].

1635 April 18
   Grant to Mason and Gorges divided with the Piscataqu River as the dividing line, Mason receiving the land to the west/south of the river, and Gorges the land to the east/north. [see 1630 above]

approximately 1639
   Sir Ferdinando Gorges extended his holding inland.

1640
   Wells settled. [see 1653 July 5 below]

1647 October 20
   Kittery incorporated, Maine’s 1st town. At the time of incorporation, Kittery included what is today Berwick, North Berwick, part of South Berwick, Eliot, and Kittery. [see 1623 above]
   Subsequent changes Kittery’s area:
      1696 - Islands in Maine’s portion of Isles of Shoals annexed to Kittery.
      1713 June 9 - land set off to form the town of Berwick
      1810 March 1 - land set off to form the town of Eliot
      1826 February 8 - land to be set off to Eliot, but repealed by act of 1829 February 7.
      1829 February 7 - same land set off to Eliot

1651
   Massachusetts Bay Colony claimed land from Plymouth Colony to 43° north latitude.

1651–
   Maine townships accepted the political control by Massachusetts Bay Colony.

1652 November 20
   Yorkshire County [now York County] established. It included “the whole tract of land beyond the River Piscataqua northerly”, but at the time only one town, Kittery, had been incorporated.
   Subsequent changes to the area of York(shire) County:
      1760 November 1 - land set off to form Cumberland County
      1760 November 1 - land set off to form Lincoln County
      1786 March 3 - part of Flintstown Plantation [now Baldwin] set off to Cumberland County. The portion of Flintstown Plantation that fell on the York County side of the line that separated Cumberland County from York County was transferred to Cumberland County to reunite Flintstown Plantation.
      1805 April 1 [effective date of 4 March 1805 legislative act] - land set off to form part of Oxford County
      1824 February 17 - a portion of Buxton set off to Standish (in Cumberland County)
      1841 March 27 - a portion of Scarborough (in Cumberland County) annexed to Saco.

1652 November 22
   York incorporated, Maine’s 2nd town. [see 1624 above]
   Subsequent change to York’s area:
      1834 February 15 - land set off to South Berwick.

1653 July 5
   Wells incorporated, Maine’s 3rd town. [see 1640 above]
   Subsequent changes to Wells’s area:
      1820 July 31 - land set off to form Kennebunk.
      1868 February 21 - part of Kennebunk annexed to Wells. The legislative act of this date [chapter 563] described the area to be transferred as follows: “Beginning at the corner of said towns of Kennebunk, Wells and Sanford, thence running down Branch river, so called, dividing said towns of kennebunk and Wells, to the new county road, leading from said town of Sanford to the town of Wells; thence down said Branch river, fifty rods from said county road; thence, northerly, parallel with said new county road, to the town line dividing said towns of Sanford and Kennebunk; thence westerly on said dividing line between Sanford and Kennebunk, to the place begun at”.

1653 July 5
   Biddeford incorporated, Maine’s 4th town. [see 1630 above and 1855 February 1 below]
   Subsequent change to Biddeford’s area:
      1762 June 15 - land set off to form District of Pepperellborough

1653 July 5
   Cape-Porpus [sic; now Kennebunkport] incorporated, Maine’s 5th town. [see 1629 above and 1719 June 10 below]

1658 July 14
   Scarborough incorporated, Maine’s 6th town. [see 1630 above]
   Subsequent changes to Scarborough’s area:
      1841 March 27 - land set off to Saco
      1864 March 4 - land set off to Gorham

1658 July 14
   Falmouth incorporated, Maine’s 7th town. [see 1632 above]
   Subsequent changes to Falmouth’s area:
      1765 November 1 - land set off to form district of Cape Elizabeth
      1786 July 4 - land set off to form Portland
      1814 February 14 - land set off to form Stroudwater [now Westbrook]
      1819 February 4 - land from Westbrook annexed to Falmouth. The legislative act [chapter 49] authorized that “Amos Knight and Ephraim Morse, with their polls, families and estates, be, and they are hereby set off from Wstbrook, and annexed to Falmouth, in the County of Cumberland”.
      1825 January 31 - land set off to Westbrook
      1828 February 11 - land from Westbrook annexed to Falmouth. The legislative act [chapter 519] of this date provided that “Joseph Leighton, with that part of his estate in the town of Westbrook, in the county of Cmberland, adjoining the town of Falmouth in said county, be, and is hereby set off from said town of Westbrook, and annexed to said town of Falmouth”.
      1831 March 22 - land from Westbrook annexed to Falmouth. The legislative act [chapter 165] of this date provided that “James Meader, with his estate, consisting of a farm whereon he now lives within the boundary line of the town of Westbrook, in the County of Cumberland, be, and hereby is set off from said town of Westbrook, and annexed to the town of Falmouth, in the County aforesaid”.
      1835 February 24 - land set off to Westbrook
      1836 March 21 - land set off to Westbrook
      1853 March 25 - land set off to Westbrook

1663
   Frankfort Plantation [later Pownalborough, now Wiscasset] settled. [see 1760 February 13 below]

1664
   Charles II, King of England, granted to James, Duke of York [his brother], land between the Kennebec and St. Croix Rivers. This grant overlapped that of Henry IV’s 1603 grant to Sieur de Monts [see 1603 November 8 above].

1670
   Limington settled. [see 1792 February 9 below]

1680 February 20
   North Yarmouth incorporated, Maine’s 8th town.
   Subsequent changes to North Yarmouth’s area:
      1734 June 22 - land from an unincorporated location annexed to North Yarmouth. Responding to a petition from the proprietors of North Yarmouth, the legislative resolve [chapter 53] passed on this date granted a tract of land to the proprietors with the following bounds: “beginning at the North West Corner of said Town and from thence to Extend a North East Course till the North easterly bounds extending North West intersect the same making the bounds of said Town square”.
      1739 June 23 - petition for land to be set off to Brunswick
      1739 October 2 - land set off to Brunswick
      1740 June 28 - land set off to Brunswick
      1741 August 5 - Small Point set off to Georgetown
      1789 February 14 - land set off to form Freeport
      1813 February 27 - land set off to Pownal
      1816 February 14 - land from Pownal annexed to North Yarmouth. The legislative act of this date [chapter 108] declared that “Samuel Lawrence of Pownal, together with his family and so much of his estate as now lies in said Pownal, be, and they are hereby set off from the town of Pownal, and annexed to the town of North Yarmouth”.
      1821 April 2 - land set off to form Cumberland
      1849 August 20 - land set off to form Yarmouth

1683
   Land of Thomas Purchase and George Way [see 1632 June 16 above] sold [see 1684 July 7 below] to Richard Wharton [see 1693 below]

1684 July 7
   Sale to Richard Wharton of Thomas Purchase and George Way land [see 1683 above] “confirmed” by deed signed by six Indian chiefs: Warumbee (or Worumbo), Darumkine, Wihikermet, Domhegon, Nehonogasset, and Numbenemet. This deed extended the sale to five miles above the uppermost falls on the Androscoggin River and three miles west of the river. [see 1814 below]

date?
   Massachusetts purchased title to the Province of Maine from the Gorges family.

1690
   Sylvester Plantation [now Turner] settled. [see 1786 July 7 below]

1691 April
   Louis XIV of France granted to “de la Motte Cadillacc”; land that included Mount Desert Island

1691 (month/day?)
   Charter granted by William and Mary to Massachusetts for the Province of Maine.

1693
   Richard Wharton died in England. [see 1683 above]

1697
   Treaty of Ryswick revoked English claims to French Acadia.

1713 June 9
   Berwick incorporated, Maine’s 9th town. Land had been set off from the town of Kittery. [see 1713 June 9 under 1647 October 20 above]
   Subsequent changes to Berwick’s area:
      1814 February [5 or 12?] - land set off to form South Berwick
      1831 March 22 - land set off to form North Berwick
      1841 March 18 - land set off to South Berwick
      1875 February 22 - land set off to North Berwick
      1881 February 5 - land set off to South Berwick

1714 November 5
   Richard Wharton’s land sold by administrator Ephraim Savage to Thomas Hutchinson, Adam Winthrop, John Watts, David Jeffries, Stephen Minot, Oliver Noyes, John Ruck, all of Boston, and to John Wentworth of Portsmouth, a group known as the Pejepscot Proprietors. [see 1683 and 1684 July 7 above]

1716 June 13
   Georgetown incorporated, Maine’s 10th town. At the time of incorporation, Georgetown included what is today Arrowsic, Bath, Phippsburg, Woolwich, and Georgetown. [see 1607 above]
   Subsequent changes to Georgetown’s area:
      1738 June 26 - Parkers Island and land west of Kennebec River annexed to Georgetown. The legislative act [chapter 54] of this date transferred “the Lands lying and being betwixt Stevens’s River and the River Sagadahock [sic] on the West about three miles into the Main with all the Inhabitants thereon, as high up on each side of the River as the Chops of Merry Meeting Bay so called or Temple Bar, be and hereby are annexed to and accounted as Part and Parcel of the town of George Town [sic], on Arrowsick [sic] Island in Sagadahock [sic] River”.
      1741 April 3 - request of petitioners that Small Point (North Yarmouth) be annexed to Georgetown. Chapter 184 orders the petitioners to “serve the Proprietors of North Yarmouth with a Copy of [the] Petition, that they shew cause (if any they have) on the first Fryday [sic] of the next May Session” as to why their petition should not be granted”.
      1741 August 5 - Small Point (in North Yarmouth) annexed to Georgetown. The legislative act [chapter 53] of this date reponded to the “Proprietors of a Point of Land adjoining to George Town [sic] in the [then] County of York called by the name of Small Point, lying on the Westerly side of Sagadahoc [now Kennebec] River” by ordering that “the Inhabitants there with their lands and Estates be and hereby are sett [sic] off from the Town of North Yarmouth and Annexd [sic] to the Town of George Town [sic]”.
      1759 October 20 - land set off to form Woolwich
      1781 February 17 - land set off to form Bath
      1814 January 26 - land set off to form Phippsburg
      1841 March 2 - land set off to form Arrowsic

1719 June 10
   Cape Porpoise renamed Arundel In the resolve of this date [chapter 25], the current spelling, Cape Porpoise, was used. [see 1653 July 5 above and 1821 February 19 below]

1725
   Thompsonborough [now Lisbon] settled. [see 1799 June 22 below]

1730
   Samuel Waldo granted the Muscongus Patent, later[?] called the Waldo Patent.

1735
   Flintstown [now Baldwin] settled. [see 1802 June 23 below]

1736
   Gorham settled. [see 1764 October 30 below]

1736 March 27
   General Court of the then Province of Massachusetts granted six miles square to 60 inhabitants of old Gloucester (= Cape Ann) to form what is now the town of New Gloucester.

1738
   New Gloucester settled. [see 1736 March 27 above and 1774 March 9 below]

1739 January 26 (new style)
   Brunswick incorporated, Maine’s 11th: town. The legislative act of incorporation [chapter 28] described the boundary of Brunswick to begin “at the mouth of a brook or rivulet called Bungamunganock, running into Maquoit Bay, where it touches upon North Yarmouth line, and from the mouth of said brook to run upon a course north-north-west, half-westerly, five miles into the wilderness, leaving a wedge or strip of land between said line and North Yarmouth; and from thence, upon a course north-east four miles, to the second falls of Amascoggin, alias Androscoggin River; from thence, down said river to Fort George, and down Merry-Meeting Bay so far a Stephen’s carrying-place, including several small islets lying in said river above said carrying-place, and over said carrying-place to the head of the creek or river that runs up to the other side of the said carrying-place; thence, down said creek or river to the mouth thereof, including an island therein. and from the mouth of said river to run by the water-side, south-westerly, to the south-west point of a place called the new meadows; thence, to strike across the cove, upon a course north-north-west, till it meets and intersects the upper end of Merryconeeg neck, four rods above the narrows of said neck commonly called the carrying-place; thence, to run along the shore to a neck of land called Mare Point, about a mile and a quarter down said neck; thence, to cross over said Mare Point and Maquoit Bay, upon a course north-west, till it comes to the place fist abovementioned”. The act said that the land contained by the above-described boundary “henceforth shall be, a township, to be called Brunswick”.
   Subsequent changes to Brunswick’s area:
      1739 June 23 - petition for land from North Yarmouth to be annexed to Brunswick. Responding to a petition from “Thomas Palmer Esqr and other Proprietors of Mare Point within the town of North Yarmouth”, the legislative act [resolve 40] of this date ordered that “the petitioners Serve the town of North Yarmouth with a Copy of the petition that they shew Cause if any they have on the first friday of the next sitting of the Court why the prayer of the petition should not be granted” [see immediately below].
      1739 October 2 - Although it appeared “that the adverse party [North Yarmouth] has been Served with a Copy of the Petition [see immediately above] but no Answer given” legislative act [chapter 89] passed, ordering that “the half of the Point of Land within mentioned [Marepoint], lying in the Township of North Yarmouth together with the Inhabitants thereon be & hereby are Set off from the Said Town of North Yarmouth, and annexed to and accounted as part of the Town of Brunswick”.
      1740 April 3 - petition from the proprietors of Sebasco Degon Islands (in North Yarmouth) that those islands be annexed to Brunswick due to the fact that “they are twelve miles distant by water and more by land from the body of the Town [of North Yarmouth]“. The legislative resolve [chapter 183] of this date ordered “the Petitioners [to] serve the Proprietors of North Yarmouth with a Copy of this Petition, that they shew cause if any they have on the first Fryday [sic] of the next May Session why the Prayer thereof should not be granted”.
      1740 June 28 - land from North Yarmouth annexed to Brunswick. Based on a petition from “Adam Winthrop Esqr & others, Proprietors of the tract of land called Merriconeag Neck, part of which is in the town of North Yarmouth; Shewing that the Inhabitants there are so inconveniently situated, and so far from the body of the said Town…, the legislative resolve [chapter 35] of this date ordered that “that part of the Neck of Land within mentioned which heretofore belonged to the Town of North Yarmo…be and hereby are Set off from the Said Town of North Yarmouth, and annexed to & accounted as part of the Town of Brunswick”.
      1790 March 4 - land from Freeport annexed to Brunswick. The legislative act [chapter 54] of this date authorized that “Benjamin Chase, together with his family & estate, be, and the same are hereby set off from the said town of Freeport and annexed to the town of Brunswick”
      1833 January 28 - land from Freeport annexed to Brunswick. The legislative act [chapter 290] of this date transferred from Freeport to Brunswick “that part of the farm, owned and occupied by Vincent Mountfort, which lics in the town of Freeport”.
      1839 February 15 - land from Freeport annexed to Brunswick. The legislative act [chapter 506] of this date transferred from Freeport to Brunswick “so much of Nathaniel Springer’s farm as lies within the town of Freeport, which piece of land is bounded as follows, viz:—beginning on the line between the towns of Freeport and Brunswick at the southeasterly part of said farm, thence running southwesterly about seventeen rods to the south corner of said farm,—thence northwesterly on the line of said farm to the west corner of the same, thence northeasterly about seventeen rods to the line dividing said towns, thence southeasterly by said town line to the first bounds”.
      1850 August 24 - land from Freeport annexed to Brunswick. The legislative act [chapter 384] of this date transferred from Freeport to Brunswick “[a]ll that part of the town of Freeport lying easterly of the following described line, viz: beginning on the line between said towns at the southerly corner of land now owned by Nathaniel Springer, and thence running southwesterly on the line between land of John Wilson and land of the widow Ward and Thomas Ward to the western corner of said John Wilson’s land; thence southeasterly on the line between land of said John Wilson and land of George Stanwood, to the eastern corner of land of said George Stanwood, on the line between said towns”.

1740
   Sanford settled. [see 1768 February 27 below]

1743
   Lebanon settled. [see 1767 June 17 below]

1748
   Buxton settled. [see 1772 July 14 below]

1753
   Dayton settled. [see 1854 April 7 below]

1753
   Phillipsburg [now Hollis] settled. [see 1798 February 27 below]

1759 October 20
   Woolwich incorporated as a district. Land, with the following bounds described in a legislative act [chapter 7] of this date, set off from Georgetown: “ beginning at Towessick Gut, at the head of Arowsick [sic] Island, or Georgetown, so called, and running northerly on Sagadahock [sic], or Kennebeck [sic], River, to a certain pine-tree marked, which is the fist marked tree in the boundary line between the proprietors of said land and the Plymouth Company; from thence, easterly on said line, to Mountsweeg [sic[ River, as the line is now established; and from thence, southerly, down said river and Mountsweeg [sic] Bay, including an island called Oak Island; and from thence, again southerly, round a point of land called Phipps’s Point; and from thence, westerly, to a point called Hellsgate, so called, into Towessick, or Neguassett, Bay, to the bounds first mentioned”.

1760
   Pearson Plantation [now Standish] settled. [see 1785 November 30 below]

1760
   Readfield settled. [see 1791 March 11 below]

1760 February 13
   Frankfort Plantation incorporated as Pownalborough [now Wiscasset], Maine’s 12th town. [see 1663 above; 1802 June 10 below]

1760 November 1
   Cumberland County established from land set off from York County.
   The legislative act establishing Cumberland County described first the eastern boundary of York County, then the eastern boundary of the newly established Cumberland County, and finally the eastern boundary of the newly established Lincoln County. The act described the eastern boundary of York County as being “a line to run from the sea, north-westerly, upon the easterly line of the township of Biddeford, as far as Narragansett, Number One [now Buxton]; from thence, north-easterly, on said Narragansett, to the easternmost corner thereof; from thence, north-westerly, on said Narragansett, to the northernmost corner thereof; from thence, south-westerly, on said Narragansett, to Saco River; from thence, up said Saco River as far as Pearsontown [now Standish] extends thereon; and from thence, to run north, two degrees west, on a true course, as far as the utmost northern limits of this province [i.e., Maine]; all the other boundary-lines of said county to remain the same as heretofore”.
   Cumberland County was then described as being bounded on the west by York County [see above]. It was further bounded “on the north, by the utmost northern limits of this province; on the south-east by the sea, or western ocean, and by Casco Bay,—from the easterly point of which bay; vizt, from Small Point, the line shall run north-westerly upon said Casco Bay to New-Meadows creek or river, and up said creek or river as far as Stevens’ carrying-place, at the head of said creek or river; thence, across said carrying-place, to Merry-Meeting Bay and Androscoggin River; from thence, it shall run up said Androscoggin River, thirty miles; and from thence, north, two degrees west, on a true course, to the utmost northern limits of this province, including all the islands in Casco Bay aforesaid and on the seacoast of the said new county”. At the time of its establishment, Cumberland County contained four incorporated towns: Scarborough, Falmouth, North Yarmouth, and Brunswick. [see 1652 November 20 above]
   Subsequent changes to the area of Cumberland County:
      1786 March 3 - The line described above that separated the newly established Cumberland County from the original York County divided Flintstown Plantation [now Baldwin] into two parts, a situation that this legislative act [3 March 1786, chapter 56] called “inconvenient”. To rectify this situation, the act annexed the York County portion of Flintstown Plantation to Cumberland County to reunite the Plantation.
      1805 April 1 - The northern portion of Cumberland County set off to become part of Oxford County. The dividing line ran from the southeast corner of Turner to the northwest corner of Minot, then southwesterly on the line between Minot and Hebron to the southwest corner of Hebron, then northwesterly on the line between Hebron and Otisfield to the town of Norway, then westerly and northerly on the line between Otisfield and Norway ro the southeast corner of Waterford, then westerly along the line between Waterford and Otisfield to the northeast corner of Bridgton, then westerly on the northerly line of Bridgton to its northwest corner, then southerly on the westerly line of Bridgton to its southwest corner, then westerly on the north line of Baldwin and Prescott’s Grant to the Saco River, then down the middle of the river to the mouth of Great Ossipee River, then westerly by a line drawn on the middle of the Great Ossipee River to the border of New Hampshire.

1760 November 1
   Lincoln County established from land set off from York County. As with the establishment of Cumberland County, Lincoln County’s western boundary was defined to be the eastern boundary of the neighboring county to the west, in this case Cumberland County. Lincoln County was further bounded “on the east, by the province of Nova Scotia; on the south and south-east, by the sea, or western ocean; and on the north, by the utmost northern limits of this province, including all the islands to the eastward of the county of [Cumberland] aforesaid”. At the time of its establishment, Lincoln County contained two incorporated towns: Georgetown and Pownalborough [now Wiscasset]. [see 1652 November 20 above]
   Subsequent changes to the area of Lincoln County:
      1790 May 1 - land set off to form Washington County
      1790 May 1 - land set off to form Hancock County
      1791 May 1 - Camden and two half-townships (from Hancock County) annexed to Lincoln County. The legislative act [chapter 24] of 1791 March 3, which was effective on 1791 May 1, annexed the land bounded as follows to Lincoln County from Hancock County: “beginning at Little Duck Trap, so called, thence running northwesterly on the northeasterly line of the town of Cambden [sic] to the northerly corner of said Cambden [sic], thence continuing on the same course with the northeasterly line of said Cambden [sic] until it intersects the dividing line between the Counties of Lincoln and Hancock, thence running southerly to Union, thence southeasterly on the east line of Union, Warren & Thomastown [sic] to Penobscot Bay, thence northerlyy by said Bay to Little Duck Trap the first mentioned bound”.
      1799 April 1 - land set off to form Kennebeck [sic] County
      1811 February 25 - The small portion of Litchfield that was in Kennebec County was annexed to Lincoln County [chapter 61]
      1812 February 29 - legislative act [chapter 160] of this date altered the boundary between Lincoln County and Kennebec County “so as to include the town of Malta [now Windsor] wholly within the said county of Kennebeck [sic], and the town of Whitefield wholly within the said county of Lincoln”
      1821 March 8 - one estate set off from Whitefield to Malta [now Windsor, in Kennebec County]
      1907 February 21 - repeal [chapter 96] of 1821 March 8 transaction
      1827 July 3 - land set off to form part of Waldo County
      1835 March 10 - Litchfield set off to Kennebec County
      1836 February 10 - one estate set off to Camden (in Knox County) from Warren [chapter 17]
      1840 March 6 Wales set off to Kennebec County
      1843 March 24 - Matinicus Island (Hancock County) annexed to Lincoln County. Section 1 of the legislative act [chapter 118] of this date reads, “The island of Matinicus in the county of Hancock is hereby set off from the county of Hancock and annexed to the county of Lincoln.”
      1852 April 9 - Islands of Hacketosh, Wooden Ball, Nomansland, Two Bush, Ten Pound, and Matinicus Rock (all from Hancock County) annexed to Lincoln County. Section 1 of the legislative act [chapter 578] of this date reads, “The islands of Hacketash, Wooden Ball, Nomansland, Two Bush, Ten Pound and Matinicus Rock, in the county of Hancock, are hereby set off from the county of Hancock and annexed to the county of Lincoln.”

1762 June 12
   New Marblehead Plantation incorporated as Windham, Maine’s 13th town. The legislative act [chapter 8: page 1, page 2] of this date described the new town as: “the whole of said plantation, bounded as follows; vizt, beginning at a place called Sacarippy [sic] Falls, in Pesumscot [sic] River, and so, as the river runs, to a great pond called Chebago [sic] Pond; thence, north, forty-five degrees east, four miles and one hundred and twenty poles; thence, south, forty-five degrees east, to the head-line of North Yarmouth; thence, south, forty-five degrees west, on said head-line three miles, to the place where the towns of Falmouth and North Yarmouth do meet and join; thence, south, twenty-four degrees and twenty minutes west, on the head-ine of Falouth, seven miles and sixty poles, to Sacarippy [sic] Falls first mentioned”. At the time of its incorporation, Windham was in the county of Cumberland, and remains so today.

1762 June 15
   District of Pepperellborough [now Saco] set off from Biddeford. The legislative act signed on this date [chapter 3] erected as the district of Pepperellborough “all the lands in the town of Biddeford, lying on the east side of Saco River, in the county of York, together with an island, in the said river, commonly called and known by the name of Indian Island [now Factory Island]”. [see 1623 above, 1762 June 15 under 1653 July 5 above, and 1775 August 23 below]

1762 September 18
   A tract of land incorporated as Bowdoinham, Maine’s 14th town. The legislative act [chapter 14: page 1, page 2] of this date described the boundary of the newly incorporated town as “beginning upon Kennebec River, on the northerly line of a lot of land containing thirty-two hundred acres, being lot number four, granted [by the] proprietors of the Kennebec purchase from the late colony of New Plymouth, to William Bowdoin, Esq.,—the line aforesaid being about four miles above, or to the northward of, a point of land called Abagadusset [sic] Point, which makes the most northerly part of Merrymeeting Bay, in said river, and where said bay begins on that side; from thence; viz., from the river aforesaid, where said line strikes it, to run a west-north-west course, upon the northerly line of the lot aforesaid, five miles; and from the end of said five miles, to run a south-south-west course ’till it shall strike a line running, from the south-westerly end of Brick Island a west-north-west course into the land (this line being the southerly line of a tract of land granted by the proprietors aforesaid to James Bowdoin, Esq.); and from thence, running an east-north-east course, upon the last-mentioned line, to the south-westerly end of the island, aforesaid, which lies in Merrymeeting Bay, and conains about ten acres, more or less; and from thence, up the river aforesaid, to the line first mentioned”. At the of Bowdoinham’s incorporation, it was part of Lincoln County.
   Subsequent changes to Bowdoinham’s area:
      1779 February 4 - land from Gardinerstown Plantation annexed to Bowdoinham. The legislative act [chapter 30] of this date
      1788 March 29 - land set off to Topsham
      1817 June 17 - land from Litchfield annexed to Bowdoinham [chapter 48]
      1823 February 10 - land set off to form Richmond [chapter 214]
      1830 March 16 - land from Topsham annexed to Bowdoinham [chapter 111]

1763
   Royalsborough [now Durham] settled. [see 1789 February 17 below]

1764 January 31
   Topsham incorporated, Maine’s 15th town. The tract of land incorporated as Topsham was decribed by the legislative act [chapter 26: page 1 (of 1)] of this date to “begin upon the southerly line of the town of Bowdoinham, where said line strikes the water, and from thence, to run a west-north-west course, upon said Bowdoinham line, as far as it goes; and from thence, on the same straight course, to Little River, so called, which is about eight miles from the water aforesaid; and from thence, southwardly, down said Little River, to Androscoggin River, and down said Androscoggin River, to Merrymeeting Bay; and from thence, to the line of Bowdoinham aforesaid, including several small islands or islets, lying in said Androscogin River, between the said Little River and the falls at Brunswick Fort”. At the time of its incorporation, Topsham was in the County of Lincoln.
   Subsequent changes to Topsham’s area:
      1788 March 29 - land from Patten’s Point (in Bowdoinham) annexed to Topsham. The legislative act [chapter 61] of this date declared that “a certain point of land belonging to the Town of Bowdoinham, in the County of Lincoln, known by the name of Patten’s Point, and seperated [sic] from the rest of the Town of Bowoinham, by the River known by the name of Cathance, be, and the same is hereby sett [sic] off from the Town of Bowdoinham, and that the same be annexed to the Town of Topsham”.
      1830 March 16 - land set off to Bowdoinham [chapter 111]

1764 October 30
   Gorham incorporated, Maine’s 16th town. The legislative act of this date [chapter 13: page 1 (of 1)], incorporated “the plantation commonly called and known by the name of Gorhamtown” and described its boundary as “beginning at a marked tree, on the westerly side of Pesumscot [sic] River, in a course south-west, twenty-three degrees, from the hemlock-tree on the other side of the said river, which is fifteen poles below Inkhorn Brook; and thence, running south, twenty-three degrees west, on the head of Falmouth, two miles and two hundred and twenty-six poles, to a spruce-tree, marked, standing about two poles westward of an old mast path,—being the corner bounds of Scarborough, Falmouth and said Gorhamtown; thence, running, on the head of Scarborough, nine hundred and fifteen poles, to a large hemlock-tree, marked “N. G.”; thence running north, thirty-three degrees west, seven miles and one-quarter of a mile, by Narragansett Numb. One, to firr-tree [sic], marked; and from thene, running north-east, seven miles and two hundred poles, to said Pesumpscot [sic] River, to a large hemlock-tree, about two rods from the said river, marked “G. P.”; and bounded, north-easterly, by said river”. At the time of its incorporation, Gorham was in the county of Cumberland, and remains so today. [see 1736 above]
   Subsequent changes to Gorham’s area:
      1831 February 19 - land from Standish annexed to Gorham. The legislative act of this date [chapter 136] transferred the land/farm of Daniel Moulton, the boundary of which was described as “[b]eginning at a stone standing in the line between the towns of Standish and Gorham, twenty-five rods North-East of the North West corner of lot numbered six, in the third division of lots in Gorham, thence North twenty-two degrees East, to a brook called the North-Branch, thence North-Easterly and Easterly down said North-Branch ’till it strikes the first mentioned line”.
      1839 March 14 - land from Standish annexed to Gorham. The legislative act of this date [chapter 538] transferred to Gorham the land of Daniel Fogg, “on which he now lives, consisting of twenty acres, within the boundary line of the town of Standish”.
      1864 March 4 - Land from Scarborough annexed to Gorham. [see 1864 March 4 under 1858 July 14] The legislative act of this date [chapter 341] described land set off from Scarborough and annexed to Gorham as: “beginning at a stone monument marked “S. G.” standing at the southwest line of the town of Gorham, and at the east corner of the town of Buxton; thence running south forty-eight degrees west, on the line between the towns of Buxton and Scarborough, two hundred and ninety-three rods to another stone monument marked “S. G.” at the south-west line of Foxwell Deering’s land; thence forty-two degrees east, six hundred and fifty-eight rods to another stone monument marked “S. G.” at the south-east line of Nonesuch meadow; thence north fifty-three degrees east, by the said south-east line of said meadow one hundred and eighty-nine rods to another stone monument marked “S. G.” on the east side of the Mitchell road; thence north forty-nine degrees east in a direct line about nine hundred and fifty rods to another stone monument marked “S. G.” at the east corner of the town of Gorham, and the north corner of the town of Scrborough, on the line of the town of Westbrook”.

1764 November 3
   Boothbay incorporated, Maine’s 17th town. Responding to the petition of “the inhabitants of land lying between Sheepscot and Damariscotta River, within the county of Lincoln, known by the name of Townsend”, the legislature passed an act [chapter 15: page 1, page 2] on this date incorporating the town of Boothbay, which was bounded as follows: “beginning at the most northerly part of a bay called the Oven’s Mouth, and from thence, to run an east-south-east course, to Damariscotta River; thence, southerly, down said river, to the sea or Western Ocean; then, to run westerly, on the sea coast, as the coast lies, to the mouth of Sheepscot River; then, to run northerly, up Sheepscot River, between Jeremy-Squam Island and Barter’s Island, to the cross river at the head of the said Barter’s Island; and from thence, over the water, to the most northerly part of the Oven’s Mouth aforesaid, with all the islands in Damariscotta River below, or to the southward of, the first described line, and also all the islands lying within six miles from the mainland, to the south, between the aforementioned rivers of Sheepscot and Damariscotta”. At the time of its incorporation, Boothbay was in the County of Lincoln, and it remains there today.
   Subsequent changes to Boothbay’s area:
      1842 February 12 - land set off to form Townsend [now Southport] [chapter 5]
      1889 February 16 - land set off to form Boothbay Harbor [chapter 381]

1765
   Brownfield settled. [see 1802 February 20 below]

1765 June 21
   Bristol incorporated, Maine’s 18th town. According to the legislative act [chapter 8: page 1 (of 1)] of this date, the town erected as Bristol was described as bounded “ beginning at a heap of stones at the head of Brown’s Cove, near the great Salt Water Falls in Damariscotta River, on the eastern side of said river, running, a south-easterly course, to a heap of stones at a place called Round Pond, five miles and a half; from thence, to run a south-westerly course, to Pemaquid Point, as the shre lies; and, from Pemaquid Point, as the shore lies, up Damariscotta River, to the first-mentioned bounds; and also all the islands lying within six mles from the main-land to the south, between the aforementioned river Damariscotta and Pemaquid Point”. At the time of its incorporation, Bristol was in the County of Lincoln, and it remains there today. [see 1766 June 19 below]

   Subsequent changes to Bristol’s area:
      1815 June 15 - land set off to Nobleboro [chapter 26]
      1828 February 14 - land set off to form Bremen [chapter 537]
      1847 July 26 - land set off to form part of Damariscotta [chapter 55]
      1915 March 26 - land set off to form South Bristol [chapter 133]

1765 November 1
   Cape Elizabeth incorporated as a district. The legislative act [chapter 25] of this date described the area incorporated as “second parish of Falmount, lying and being on the south side of the Fore River, in Falmouth, running up said river, towards Stroudwater River, until it comes within half a mile of the mouth, or entrance, of said Stroudwater River, and thence, on a due west course, or line, across to Scarborough line”. [see 1630 above and 1775 August 23 below]

1766 June 19
   Almost exactly a year after Bristol was incorporated, a follow-up legislative act [chapter 2: page 1, page 2] of this date refined the boundary of Bristol by annexing a parcel of land, whose boundaries began “at a place called Brown’s Cove, on the easterly side of Damariscotta River, at the head or north-east part of said cove, at a stake and heap of stones, being the northerly bounds of the town of Bristol; thence running, east, according to the present direction of the magnetick [sic] needle, being north, six degrees and [an] half west, eleven hundred and twenty poles, to a white-birch tree standing on the westerly bank of Pemaq[a][u[id Great Pond, so called; thence, over said pond to a dry birch-tree standing on the eatern bank of the said pond; thence, running, northerly, o the bank of said pond, until it cometh to the mouth of the river than runneth out of the Upper Pond, so called, into the Great Pond aforesaid; thence, running, northerly, up the said river, one hundred and twenty poles, to a stake standing near the said river, being John Martyn’s north-west corner-bounds; thence, running, south-east, six hundred and twenty poles, to a stake standng on Jacob Easton’s line; thence, running, north-east, eighty-four poles, to a stake standing in a fresh meadow; thence, running, south-east, two hundred and four poles, to the eastern Creek of Broad Cove, so called, on Muscongus River, to a pine-tree marked on four sides, being said Eaton’s north-east corner-bounds (the three last-mentioned lines dividing between the English and Dutch settlements); from thence, southerly, down the western shore, on said Muscongus River, to Round Pond, as the [shore livith], to the bounds mentioned in the act for incorporating the town of Bristol” [see 1765 June 21 above].

1767
   Coxhall [now Lyman] settled. [see 1778 March 11 below]

1767 June 17
   Lebanon incorporated, Maine’s 19th town. The legislative act [chapter 3: page 1, page 2] of this date incorporated Lebanon Plantation into the town of Lebanon. At the time of its incorporation Lebanon was part of York County, and it remains so today. [see 1743 above]
   Subsequent changes to Lebanon’s area:
      1785 March 5 - land annexed from an unincorporated land
      1787 February 27 - land from Sanford annexed to Lebanon [ch. 64]
      1793 February 14 - land set off to Shapleigh [ch. 34]
      1825 February 23 - land from Shapleigh annexed to Lebanon. The legislative act [chapter 326] of this date annexed to Lebanon “several tracts of land, lying within the limits and being a part of the town of Shapleigh, in the county of York, known by the names following, viz. Baker’s grant, Waldron’s grant, Hamilton’s grant, Andros’ lot, Eleazer Knox’s lot, and Horsom’s gore”.

1768
   Poland settled. [see 1795 February 17 below]

1768
   Waterboro settled. [see 1787 March 6 below]

1768 February 27
   Sanford incorporated, Maine’s 20th town. The legislative act [chapter 21: page 1 (of 1)] of this date “erected” [not incorporated] an area called Phillipstown as Sanford. At the time Sanford was in York County, and it remains so today. [see 1740 above]
   Subsequent changes to Sanford’s area:
      1786 February 27 - unincorporated land annexed to Sanford [ch. 64]?
      1787 February 27 - land set off to Lebanon and Shapleigh [ch.64?]
      1794 February 4 - land set off to form District of Alfred [ch. 31]
      1820 February 10 - land from Shapleigh annexed to Sanford. The legislative act of this date [chapter 234] transferred three parcels of land from Shapleigh to Sanford: “two hundred acres formerly belonging to Kendal [sic]; three hundred and sixty nine acres, purchased of this Commonwealth [now Massachusetts] by William Frost, Junior; and so much of the three hundred acres granted to John Lydston, as was formerly owned and possessed by the said William Frost, Junior”.
      1828 February 23 - land from Alfred annexed to Sanford. The legislative act [chapter 565] of this date annexed to Sanford the following described land in Alfred: “Beginning at the southeast end of land owned by Elias Littlefield, on the line between the towns of Alfred and Sanford, and running northeast to land formerly owned by John Trafton; thence northwest to land owned by James Ridley; thence northeasterly by land owned by said Ridley and John Beadle, to the east corner of the said Beadle’s land; thence northerly by the said Beadle’s land to the line of the town of Shapleigh; thence west by the said line of Shapleigh to the west corner of the town of Alfred; thence southeast by the line of the towns of Alfred and Saanford, to the first mentioned bounds”.

1769
   Minot settled. [see 1802 February 18 below]

1770
   Livermore settled. [see 1795 February 28 below]

1770 April
   General Court of former Province of Massachusetts Bay, granted to “Ichabod Jones, and seventy-nine others, his associates, their heirs and assigns tract of land called Machias, in Lincoln County”. [see
1784 June 23 below]

1771 April 26
   Hallowell incorporated, one of four towns to be incorporated on this day. The legislative act [chapter 27: page 1, page 2] of this date incorporated “a certain tract of land lying on the east and west sides of Kennebeck [sic] River”. At the time of its incorporation, Hallowell was in Lincoln County.
   Subsequent changes to Hallowell’s area:
      1797 February 20 - land set off to form Harrington [chapter 49]
      1812 February 17 - land from Augusta annexed to Hallowell [chapter 114]
      1813 February 23 - land from Augusta annexed to Hallowell [chapter 98]
      1813 June 14 - land from Winthrop annexed to Hallowell [chapter 39]
      1813 [month, day?] = ;and from Winthrop annexed to Hallowell [chapter 28]
      1834 February 24 - land set off to Gardiner [chapter 458]
      1844 February 29 - land set off to Pittston [chapter 147]
      1850 August 17 - land set off to form Chelsea [chapter 364]
      1850 August 2 - land set off t form part of Kennebec [chapter 355]
      1852 April 3 - land set off to form part of Farmingdale [chapter 549]
      1852 April 9 - land from Augusta annexed to Hallowell [chapter 573]
      1860 February 24 - land from Manchester annexed to Hallowell [chapter 394]
      1870 March 15 - land set off to Manchester [chapter 469]
      1870 March 22 - land from Manchester annexed to Hallowell [chapter 498]

1771 April 26
   Winthrop incorporated, one of four towns to be incorporated on this day. The legislative act [chapter 30: page 1, page 2] of this date incorporated “a certain tract of land called Pondtown”. At the time of its incorporation, Winthrop was in Lincoln County.
   Subsequent changes to Winthrop’s area:
      1791 March 11 - land set off to form Readfield [chapter 46]
      1810 February 24 - land from Readfield annexed to Winthrop [chapter 57]
      1810 February 27 - land from Augusta annexed to Winthrop [chapter 67]
      1813 June 11 - land from Monmouth annexed to Winthrop [chapter 15]
      1813 June 14 - land set off to Hallowell [chapter 39]
      1814 June 13 - land set off to Hallowell [chapter 28]
      1816 December 4 - land from Wayne annexed to Winthrop [chapter 58]
      1839 March 13 - land from Wayne annexed to Winthrop [chapter 535]
      1850 August 12 - land set off to form part of Kennebec [chapter 355]
      1852 March 30 - land from Kennebec annexed to Winthrop [chapter 539]
      1852 April 19 - land from Wayne annexed to Winthrop [chapter 606]
      1873 February 14 - land from Manchester annexed to Winthrop [chapter 280]

1772
   Shapleigh settled. [see 1785 March 5 below]

1772
   Parsonsfield settled. [see 1785 March 5 below]

1772
   Peabody’s Patent - Oliver and John Peabody (of Andover, Massachusetts) and Samuel Bodwell (of Methuen, Massachusetts) purchased 6000 acres north of Sudbury Canada [now Bethel; see 1804 June 23 below] [source: The Smile of Providence: A History of Gilead, Maine by Howard C. Reiche Jr. and Hugh G. Chapman]

1772 July 14
   Buxton incorporated, Maine’s 25th town. [see 1748 above] The legislative act [chapter 10] of this date, which incorporated the plantation of Narragansett Number One as the town of Buxton, described the newly incorporated town as being bounded “south-easterly, at the heads of Biddeford and Scarborough; south-westerly, by Saco River; northwesterly, by Pearsontown [now Standish], so called; and north-easterly by Gorham’.
   Subsequent changes to Buxton’s area:
      1824 February 17 - land set off to Standish [chapter 276]

1773
   Wales settled. [see 1816 February 1 below]

1774
   Hiram settled. [see 1814 June 14 below]

1774
   Webster [now Sabattus] settled. [see 1840 March 7 below]

1774
   Fairfield settled. [see 1788 June 18 below]

1774 March 9
   New Gloucester Plantation incorporated as New Gloucester, Maine’s 29th town. [see 1738 above]
   Subsequent changes to New Gloucester’s area:
      1816 - southeast part of Thompson Pond Plantation annexed to New Gloucester [chapter 97]
      1838 March 23 - unorganized land annexed to New Gloucester [chapter 499]

1775
   Appleton Plantation settled. [see 1829 January 28 below]

1775
   Limerick settled. [see 1787 March 6 below]

1775 August 23
   District of Pepperellborough [now Saco] incorporated, Maine’a 33rd town. . [see 1762 June 15 above; see 1805 February 23 below]
   Subsequent changes to Pepperellborough/Saco’s area:
      1841 March 27 - land from Scarborough annexed to Saco. [see 1841 March 27 under 1658 July 14 above] The legislative act of this date [chapter 136] specified the land to be transferred to be “all that part of Scarborough, in the county of Cumberland, which lies within the limits of Lewis and Bonython’s patent, to wit, all that part of said Scarborough, which lies westerly of the patent line, so called, as said line is known and defined” [see 1629 February 12 above].
      1883 February 20 - land set off to form Old Orchard
      1927 April 16 - land set off to Old Orchard

1775 August 23
   Cape Elizabeth incorporated, Maine’s 34th town. [see 1765 November 1 above]

1776
   Litchfield settled. [see 1795 February 18 below]

1776
   Cornish settled. [see 1794 February 27 below]

1776 November 7
   Warren incorporated, Maine’s 35th town. The legislative act [chapter 17] of this date responded to a petition from the inhabitants of St. Georges Plantation, and incorporated the town of Warren with the following boundary: “beginning at the west side of the river called St. George’s River, at the north side of William Palmer’s land; thence running a west-north-west course, to Moses Copelin’s south line; and then, running upon said line, a west course, until it strikes Waldoboro[ugh]’s line to the South Pond; and from thence, along said line to West Pond; then running along said line until it reaches the township of the Honorable John Taylor, Esqr; then running an east course, upon said Taylor’s line, about six miles and an-half on the line of said township, until it comes to Camden line; and thence, on said Camden line, south-east and by south, about two miles and a-half; and from thence, taking a bend, south-south-west course, about five miles and one-half of a mile, to the old fort; and then, crossing said St. George’s River, to Watson’a Pointl; and then, running down the river, as the shore is, to said William Palmer’s line
, being the first bounds mentioned”.
   Subsequent changes to Warren’s area:
      1777 March 20 - land set off to form part of Thomaston [chapter 34]
      1798 June 28 - land set off to Thomaston [chapter 28]
      1807 February 6 - land set off to Cushing [chapter 30]
      1836 February 10 - land set off to Camden
      1864 February 12 - land set off to Thomaston [chapter 307]

1777 March 20
   Thomaston incorporated, Maine’s 37th town. The legislative act [chapter 34] of this date combined the easterly part of Warren and the easterly part of St. Georges Plantation into the town of Thomaston. A description of the two parcels is as follows:
   easterly part of Warren: “beginning on the easterly side of St. George’s River, at the westerly corner of John Alexander’s lot; from thence, running north thirty-two degrees east, about seven miles, to the line of the township called Camden, belonging to the twenty associates called the Lincolnshire company; and … all the lands belonging to the town of Warren, easterly of said line, containing about six thousand acres”
   easterly part of St. Georges Plantation: “beginning on the easterly side of St. George’s River at the westerly corner of John Alexander’w lot; thence southwesterly and southerly, by said river, to a line at a spruce-tree, marker No 23 and 24, across the neck, to the sea-shore; thence, south-easterly, by Muscle Ridge Bay, so called, easterly and north-easterly, by Owl’s Head Bay; thence, north-westerly, about five miles, by Camden line aforesaid to where it intersects the first-mentioned line, together with all the islands that lay within three miles of the main land and within the direction of the lines that run to the sea”.
   Subsequent changes to Thomaston’s area:
      1798 June 28 - land from Warren annexed to Thomaston [chapter 28]
      1848 July 28 - land set off to form East Thomaston and South Thomaston
      1849 July 17 - land set off to East Thomaston [chapter 216]
      1852 April 5 - land from Rockland annexed to Thomaston chapter 554]
      1864 February 12 - land from Warren annexed to Thomaston [chapter 307]
      1891 February 21 - land from Cushing annexed to Thomaston [chapter 101]
      1909 - land from Cushing annexed to Thomaston [chapter 254]

1778
   Newfield settled. [see 1794 February 26 below]

1778 March 11
   Coxhall [now Lyman] incorporated, Maine’s 38th town. [see 1767 above; 1803 February 26 below]

1779
   Littleborough Plantation [now Leeds] settled. [see 1801 February 16 below]

1780
   East Andover [now Andover] settled. [see 1824 June 3 below]

1781 February 17
   Bath incorporated, as Maine’s 41st town. Pursuant to the legislative act [chapter 11] of this date, the second parish of Georgetown was set off to form the town of Bath. The newly incorporated town was bounded “Northwardly and Eastwardly by Merry-Meeting-Bay; Southwardly by Kennebeck [sic] River; and Southwardly and Westwardly by Winnogance [sic] Creek, so called; and from said Creek by a Path which was formerly an Indian carrying Place, as said Path runs to the nearest Part of Casco-Bay”.

1783
   East Butterfield [now Hartford] settled. [see 1798 June 13 below]

1783
   West Butterfield [now Sumner] settled. [see 1798 June 13 below]

1784 June 23
   Machias incorporated. Because the conditions of the original grant [see 1770 April above] were fulfilled, the tract of land called Machias was incorporated by the General Court. The boundary was as follows: “beginning at a dry rock at a place called the Eastern Bay, near the house of Mr. Samuel Holmes, and extending north ten degrees, west ten miles; then west ten degrees, south eight miles; then south ten degrees, east ten miles; then east ten degrees, north eight miles, to the first mentioned bounds”.

1785 March 5
   Shapleigh incorporated, Maine’s 43rd town. [see
1772 above] The newly incorporated town of Shapleigh was, according to the legislative act [chapter 47] of this date, composed of two parcels: (1) “the tract of land in the county of York, lying below Little Ossipee River, granted and confirmed to the proprietors claiming the same under Nicholas Shapleigh” and (2) “a gore of land on the northeasterly side [of (1) above], adjoining the same, which the proprietors of lands, under the will of Bridget Phillips, for a valuable consideration, have released to the said Shapleigh proprietors”. Together these parcels contained “about sixty square miles, and are bounded, westerly, by Salmon Fall [sic] river, and by a line … between New Hampshire and the late Province of Maine, northerly by Little Ossipee pond and river; easterly, by lands of the said Phillips’s proprietors in part, and partly by a gore of land belonging to the Commonwealth; southerly, by lands of the Commonwealth in part, and partly by lands lying in no place incorporated, but laid out and held by virtue of province grants”.
   Subsequent changes to Shapleigh’s area:
      1787 February 27 - land from Sanford annexed to Shapleigh [chapter 64]
      1793 February 14 - land from Lebanon annexed to Shapleigh [chapter 34]
      1820 February 10 - land set off to Sanford [chapter 234]
      1825 February 23 - land set off to Lebanon [chapter 326]
      1830 March 6 - land set off to form Acton [chapter 79]
      1831 March 22 - land from Acton annexed to Shapleigh [chapter 166]
      1846 June 30 - land set off to Newfield [chapter 321]
      1854 March 14 - land from Waterboro annexed to Shapleigh [chapter 214]

1785 March 5
   Parsonsfield incorporated, Maine’s 44th town. [see
1772 above] The tract of land incorporated by the legislative act [chapter 54] of this date was bounded as follows: “Beginning at Great Ossipee river, where the province line (so-called) between New Hampshire and the late province of Maine, crosses the said river; thence running south, eight degrees west, by the said line, to the top of a mountain three quarters of a mile south of a pond, called Province Pond; thence east, eight degrees south, by a spotted line, to an elm tree, spotted near a small frog pond; thence north, eight degreees east, by a spotted line, to the bank of Great Ossipee river; thence westerly by the said river to the bounds first mentioned; containing by estimation thirty-six square English miles”.
   Subsequent change to Parsonsfield’s area:
      1876 February 12 - boundary established between Cornish and Parsonsfield [chapter 266]

1785 November 30
   Pearsontown Plantation incorporated as Standish, Maine’s 45th town. [see 1760 above] The legislative act [30 November 1785, chapter 40] described the boundary of Standish as follows: “Beginning at the northerly corner of Gorham, by Presumscut [sic] River; thence running up said river to the outlet of Soubago [sic] Pond; thence northwest, across said pond, six miles; thence southwest, eight miles, to Saco River; thence to run down said river adjoining the same to the westerly corner of Buxton; thence north-east, three miles and two hundred and twenty rods to the northerly corner of said Buxton; thence south, thirty-three degrees east, to the westerly corner of Gorham; thence northeast, adjoining the head of Gorham, to the first mentioned bound”.
   Subsequent changes to Standish’s area:
      1824 February 17 - land from Buxton annexed to Standish. The legislative act of this date [chapter 276] specified that “Jonathan Moore, Josiah Paine, Thomas Leavitt, Josiah Berry, Enoch Boothby, Theophilus Waterhouse, William Spear, Benjamin M’Corrison, Joseph M’Corrison and Peter Paine, inhabitants of the town of Buxton, in the county of York, together with their polls and estates” were set off to Standish. The boundary of the transferred land was described as “beginning at the north corner of Buxton aforesaid; thence running southeasterly by the line between Buxton and Standish to lot No. 1, in K range in the third division of lands in Buxton; thence southwesterly by said K range, and continuing the same course to a large pond, lying in the fourth division of lands in Buxton, and known by the name of Bonny Eagle Pond; thence northwestly [sic] to the now established line between said Buxton and Standish”.
      1831 February 19 - land set off to Gorham [chapter 136]
      1839 March 14 - land set off to Gorham [chapter 538]
      1869 February 24 - land set off to Raymond [chapter 171]

1786
   Auburn settled. [see 1842 February 24 below]

1786 July 4
   Portland incorporated, Maine’s 46th town. [see 1658 July 14 above] The act of incorporation [chapter 14] described the boundary as follows: “Beginning at the middle of the Creek that runs into Round Marsh (so called) thence north east, to Backcove Creek, thence down the middle of that Creek to Back-Cove, thence across the cove to sandy point, thence round by Casco Bay to Fore River, thence up Fore river, to the first bounds together with all the Islabds that now belong to the first Parish in said Falmouth”.

1786 July 7
   Sylvester Plantation incorporated as Turner, Maine’s 47th town. [see 1690 above] The act of incorporation described the boundary as follows: “beginning in a place in Androscoggin River, called crooked repels, at a large tree marked S, about six miles (as the river runs) above Androscoggin great falls, which was denominated in the confirmation of the Grant of the said township, to the proprietors, dated June the twentieth, one thousand seven hundred and sixty eight, ‘the easterly corner of Bakerstown so called,’ from thence running north twenty six degrees by that which at the aboveside date was Province land ten miles and one hundred and eighty rods to a stake with stones about it, thence running by then province land, south, sixty degrees east, three miles and two hundred and fifty rods to a heap of stones by the said River; thence running southerly by the said River to the bounds first mentioned”.

1787 March 6
   Limerick incorporated, Maine’s 50th town. [see 1760 above]

1787 March 6
   Waterboro incorporated, Maine’s 51st town. [see 1768 above]

1788 June 18
   Norridgewock incorporated, Maine’s 54th town. The law (chapter 10; page 1, page 2) set out the bounds of the new town.
   Subsequent changes affecting the land area of Norridgewock:
      1828 February 2 - land set off to Milburn [chapter 508]
      1834 February 21 - land from Fairfield annexed to Norridgewock [chapter 454]
      1836 February 11 - land from East Pond Plantation annexed to Norridgewock [chapter 19]
      1841 April 16 - land from Fairfield annexed to Norridgewock [chapter 177]
      1846 July 30 - land from Madison annexed to Norridgewock [chapter 366]
      1849 July 26 - land from Mercer annexed to Norridgewock [chapter 236]
      1852 January 12 - land from Mercer annexed to Norridgewock [chapter 457]
      1852 March 27 - land from Smithfield annexed to Norridgewock [chapter 538]
      1856 April 9 - land set off to Skowhegan [chapter 671]
      1907 February 28 - land from Starks annexed to Norridgewock [chapter 132]

1788 June 18
   Lewistown Plantation[?] incorporated as Greene, Maine’s 55th town. The act of incorporation described the boundary as follows: “Beginning at the south west corner of Lot Number One, thence running southeast, to the Plymouth line so called, thence northerly by said Plymouth line, to the north-east corner of the said plantation or lot, Number One hundred and ninety, thence northwest to Androscoggin river, thence southerly by said river, so as to bring the first mentioned bounds to bear south east, thence south-east to the first mentioned bounds”. [source: Acts and Resolves of Massachusetts 1788–89, chapter 6]

1788 June 18
   Fairfield incorporated, Maine’s 56th town. [see 1774 above]
   Subsequent changes to Fairfield’s area:
      1834 February 21 - land set off to Norridgewock
      1841 April 16 - land set off to Norridgewock
      1859 February 22 - land set off to Bloomfield
      1873 February 27 - land from Benton annexed to Fairfield

1788 June 18
   Canaan incorporated, Maine’s 57th town. The legislative act of this date [chapter 9] described the boundary of the newly incorporated town as follows: “beginning at the south east corner of lot Number thirty four, in said Canaan, on Kennebeck [sic] river, at the north easterly corner of Fairfield, thence running west, four miles and two hundred and eight poles, then north, about three miles & an half, to Kennebeck [sic] river, then down said river, to the head of Scowhegan [sic] falls, so called, thence north about one mile & one hundred and ninety six poles, to Noridgewock [sic] north line, or a line runing [sic] east from Noridgewock [sic] point, thence east nine miles & forty poles, thence south, about six miles & an half, until it meets a line runing [sic] a west course across Kennebeck ]sic] River, to the first mentioned bounds”.
   Subsequent changes to Canaan’s area:
      1814 February 5 - land set off to form Bloomfield
      1823 February 5 - land set off to form Milburn [chapter 193]
      1824 February 9 - land from Warsaw annexed to Canaan [chapter 255]
      1830 March 12 - land from Pittsfield annexed to Canaan [chapter 96]
      1841 - land from Pittsfield annexed to Canaan [chapter 104]
      1849 July 17 - land from Hartland annexed to Canaan [chapter 213]
      1849 July 24 - land from Clinton annexed to Canaan [chapter 234] was repealed on 1850 August 8 [chapter 351]

1789 January 30
   Deer Island Plantation, Little Deer Island, and Isles of Holt [sic] incorporated as Deer Isle, Maine’s 63rd town.

1789 February 14
   Freeport incorporated, Maine’s 64th town. The land that became Freeport included land set off from North Yarmouth plus Prout’s Gore. Land belonging to North Yarmouth was divided by a line running south southeast and described in the legislative act [chapter 62] of this date as follows: “beginning at the rear or back line of said Town of North Yarmouth, which divides said North Yarmouth from the Town of New Gloucester, where the line between the Two hundred & Eighty Acre Division, and the Four hundred & fifty Acre Division intersects or strikes the said back line, thence running on said line between the two hundred & eighty acre division and the Four hundred & fifty Acre division in said North Yarmouth, untill [sic] it meets with the line called the Old Town line, thence running Westerly on said Old Town line, till it meets or strikes the line dividing the hundred & twenty acre division from the Hundred Acre division, on the East side of Royals [sic] River (so called) in said Town, thence running on the last mentioned dividing line, and continuing that course till it strikes the Chanel [sic] of the Eastern Branch of Cozens [sic] River, till it comes as near as may be, to a certain point of Land, called Lane̱s Point, thence running an East-southeast coarse [sic] into the Bay or Sea”. Islands cut by the above-described line remained with North Yarmouth, and “all the Lands & Islands on the Northeasterly side of the above described Line, which before the passing of this Act belonged to the Town of North Yarmouth together with a Tract of Land known by the name of Prout’s Gore, lying between said North Yarmouth & Brunswick, with all the Inhabitants dwelling or residing on the Land above described, be, and they are hereby Incorporated into a Town by the name of Freeport”.
   Subsequent changes to Freeport’s area:
      1790 March 4 - land set off to Brunswick
      1808 March 3 - land set off to form Pownal
      1833 January 28 - land set off to Brunswick [chapter 290]
      1839 February 15 - land set off to Brunswick [chapter 506]
      1850 August 24 - land set off to Brunswick [chapter 384]

1789 February 17
   Royalsborough Plantation incorporated as Durham, Maine’s 69th town. [see 1763 above] The act of incorporation described the boundary as follows: “Beginning at the Westerly corner of a tract of Land called Prout’s Gore in the line of North Yarmouth, thence North West seven Miles adjoining said North Yarmouth, thence North East to Androscoggin river, thence South easterly by the middle of said river to the head line of Brunswick, thence South westerly adjoining the head line of Brunswick & said Prout’s Gore to the first mentioned bounds”.
   [For more history of the town, see Durham]

1790
   Sebago settled. [see 1826 February 10 below]

1790 May 1
   Hancock County established. The legislative act establishing Hancock County and Washington County described first the eastern boundary of Lincoln County, then the eastern boundary of the newly established Hancock County, and finally the eastern boundary of the newly established Washington County. The act described the eastern boundary of Lincoln County as being “a line beginning at Penobscot bay, in the boundary line between the town of Thomastown [sic], and the town of Cambden [sic]' thence running northwesterly by the east line of Thomastown [sic], Warren & Union, to the northeast corner of Union, thence north twenty two degrees & one half of a degree east, until it intersects the north line of the Waldo Patent, thence north, to the highlands; all the other boundary lines of said County [i.e., Lincoln] to remain the same as heretofore: Provided that no Island lying to the eastward of a line to be drawn due south from the most easterly part of the County of Lincoln, as declared to be bounded by this Act shall be considered as belonging to the said County of Lincoln”.
   Hancock County was then described as being bounded on the west by Lincoln County [see above]. It was further bounded “easterly by a line beginning at the bounds making the northeast corner of :Goldsborough [sic], and southeast corner of Township number seven, thence running northerly by the east line of Number seven, and by the east line of Number ten, to the southeast corner of Township Number sixteen, from thence due north to the Highlands, including all the Islands on the sea coast of the said new County, lying between lines drawn due south from the easterly part of the County of Lincoln as before described and the north easterly corner of Gouldsborough aforesaid, and all the towns, districts and lands within said bounds”.
   Subsequent changes to the area of Hancock County:
      1791 May 1 - Camden and two half-townships set off to Lincoln County
      1799 February 28 - Township Number Four in the first range north of the Waldo Patent [now Troy] set off to Kennebec County
      1811 - Township Number Four in the fifth range north of the Waldo Patent [now Dexter] annexed from Somerset County
      1812 - Township Number Four in the sixth range [now Sangerville] set off to Somerset County
      1813 - Township Number Four in the fourth range set off to Somerset County
      1816 April 1 - land set off to form Penobscot County
      1827 July 3 - land set of to form part of Waldo County
      1851 - T4 ND, T41 MD, and T35 MD set off to Washington County
      1835 - 2-mile by 6-mile strip north of Township Number Two set off to Burlington (Penobscot County)
      1838 - Vinalhaven set off to Waldo County
      1841 February 20 - Page’s Mills Settlement set off to Lowell (Penobscot County)
      1841 April 10 - land set off from Bucksport and Dedham to Brewer
      1843 March 24 - Matinicus Island set off to Lincoln County
      1844 March 12 - [boundary change, Gouldsboro]
      1850 - land from Bucksport set off to Orrington (Penobscot County)
      1852 April 9 - Islands of Hacketash, Wooden Ball, Nomansland, Two Bush, Ten Pound, and Matinicus Rock set off to Lincoln County
      1858 - Greenfield, T1 ND, and T2 ND set off to Penobscot County
      1913 March 12 - Isle au Haut set off to Knox County

1790 May 1
   Washington County established. The legislative act establishing Hancock County and Washington County described first the eastern boundary of Lincoln County, then the eastern boundary of the newly established Hancock County, and finally the eastern boundary of the newly established Washington County. The eastern boundary of Hancock County and, hence, the western boundary of Washington County was defined “by a line by a line beginning at the bounds making the northeast corner of :Goldsborough [sic], and southeast corner of Township number seven, thence running northerly by the east line of Number seven, and by the east line of Number ten, to the southeast corner of Township Number sixteen, from thence due north to the Highlands, including all the Islands on the sea coast of the said new County, lying between lines drawn due south from the easterly part of the County of Lincoln as before described and the north easterly corner of Gouldsborough aforesaid, and all the towns, districts and lands within said bounds”. The remaining boundaries are the same as those that defined the original Lincoln County, specifically: “on the east, by the province of Nova Scotia; on the south and south-east, by the sea, or western ocean; and on the north, by the utmost northern limits of this province”.
   Subsequent changes to the boundaries of Washington County:
      1831 March 15 - Madawaska set off to Penobscot County.
      1831 March 17 - T4 ND, T41 MD, and T35 MD set off to Hancock County
      1839 - land set off to Aroostook County
      1844 - eight townships set off to Penobscot County

1791 February 17
   Cambden [sic] incorporated, Maine’s 72nd town. The legislative act [chapter 18] of this date established the following boundaries for the town: “Beginning at a rock marked A X on the sea shore at the north side of Owls head bay at southeast corner of Thomastown [sic] line, thence running northwest by north seven miles sixty four poles to a maple stake marked on four sides and pile of stones, thence running north east by east five miles ninety four poles to a beach [sic] tree marked on four sides; thence running east three miles and an half and twenty poles to a spruce tree marked on four sides, thence running south east by south one mile to a fir tree marked on four sides, at Little Duck Trap in Penobscot bay; thence by the sea shore in a westerly direction to the bounds first mentioned”.
   Subsequent changes to Cambden’s area:
      1836 February 10 - land from Warren annexed to Cambden[sic]. The legislative act [chapter 17] of this date annexed to Cambden [sic] “Nathaniel Carril together with his farm, on which he now lives, and which is bounded as follows: to wit, beginning at a stake and stones on the Town line of said Cam[b]den, thence running South fifty six degrees West about forty rods to a stake and stones to land of William Gregory, thence North thirty four degrees West two hundred and sixty rods to stake and stones, thence north fifty six degrees east forty rods to said Cam[b]den line, thence by said Town line to the bounds first mentioned”. At the time of this act, Warren was in Lincoln County and Cam[b]den was in Waldo County.

1791 March 11
   The northern portion of Winthrop set off and incorporated as Readfield, Maine’s 74th town. According to the legislative act of incorporation, the portion of Winthrop set off was north of a line “beginning on the south line of lot number thirty two in said Winthrop where the west line of Hallowell crosses said lot, from thence running west northwest on the range line to <:i>Chandler’s pond, then westerly across said pond to the southeast corner of lot number two hundred & twenty, then westerly on the south line of said lot to southwest corner of said lot, then northerly to the northeast corner of lot number sixty six, from thence west northwest on the north line of lots number sixty six, ninety three & one hundred fifty six, to the westerly line of said town”. [see 1760 above]

1792 February 9
   Limington incorporated, Maine’s 77th town. [see 1670 above]

1794 February 26
   Newfield incorporated, Maine’s 87th town. [see 1778 above]

1794 February 27
   Cornish incorporated, Maine’s 88th town. [see 1776 above]

1795 February 17
   Poland incorporated, Maine’s 92nd town. The tract of land described as follows: “beginnng at a great Rock in Amariscoggin Falls called the Twenty mile Falls; then running Southwest to New Gloucester side Line; then by said Line to the Northeast corner of the said New Glouceser; then Southwest on the Head Line of New Gloucester four miles; then runnng Northwest about seven miles & one quarter of a mile to Hebron; then running Northeast by Hebron Line, to Turner; then by Turner Line to Amariscoggin River; then down said River to the bounds first mentioned”. [see 1768 above]

1795 February 18
   Litchfield incorporated, Maine’s 93rd town. [see 1776 above)

1795 February 28
   Livermore Plantation incorporated as Livermore, Maine’s 98th town. [see 1770 above.] The act of incorporation described the boundary as follows: “Beginning at a Hemlock Tree standing in the North east corner of Turner on the Westerly side of Androscoggin river, thence running North sixty Degrees West in the Northeasterly line of said Turner two miles two hundred & ten rods to a birch tree, thence North four miles two hundred & forty rods to a Hemlock tree being the Northwesterly corner of said Livermore, thence North sixty five degrees East three miles & one hundred rods to Androscoggin river, thence East across said river, two miles two hundred & sixty rods to a birch tree in the Northeast corner of said Livermore, thence South seven Miles two hundred & fifty rods to Androscoggin pond, thence Southerly by said Pond about one mile & an [sic] half to an elm tree standing in the Southerly line of said Livermore, thence West in said Southerly line about two miles & one hundred & ninety two rods to Androscoggin river, thence Northerly by said river to the first mentioned bound”.
   Subsequent changes to Livermore’s area:
      1802 - land set off to Leeds
      1821 February 8 - land set off to Wayne
      1834 March 7 - part of Chandler’s Gore annexed to Livermore
      1843 March 20 - land set off to form East Livermore [now Livermore Falls], which was incorporated at the same time

1795 June 24
   Mosher-Haskell Grant, first grant [of three] of land in Plantation No. 4 [now Greenwood]. General Court of Massachusetts to James Mosher, John Haskell, and John Akers, 1000 acres along Norway town line (i.e., southern end of township), laid out by Lothrop Lewis. [see 1797 February 27 and 1805 February 1 below] [source: The Early History of Greenwood, Maine: With a History of the Alder River Ponds of Greenwood and Woodstock, Maine by Blaine Mills; edited by Amy Wight Chapman and William F. Chapman]

1797 February 14
   “Plantation number Six, west of Machias” incorporated as Addison, Maine’s 108th town. The legislative act of incorporation described the boundary of Addison as “beginning at the west side of the mouth of Indian River; thence running a northerly course bounded by the said River to the south-easterly corner of the Town of Columbia; West bounded on said Town of Columbia, to the Northeasterly corner of Plantation number Five; thence South to Pleasant River, thence down said River and round the shore following the course thereof to the first mentioned bounds”.

1797 February 27
   Second grant [of three] of land in Plantation No. 4 [now Greenwood]. General Court of Massachusetts to Trustees of Phillips Academy, 11,520 acres in center of township, laid out by Lothrop Lewis. [see 1795 June 24 above and 1805 February 1 below] [source: The Early History of Greenwood, Maine: With a History of the Alder River Ponds of Greenwood and Woodstock, Maine by Blaine Mills; edited by Amy Wight Chapman and William F. Chapman]

1797 March 2
   Waterford incorporated, Maine’s 110th town. Legislative act [chapter 63] of this date, incorporated part of the Plantation of Waterford. The boundary described by the act was as follows: “beginning at the Northwesterly corner of Otisfield, thence running North, sixty five degrees East, twelve hundred and seventy rods by said Otisfield to the dividing line between the third and fourth tier of Lots, westerly from the easterly side line of said Waterford; then North, twenty five degrees West, on the dividing line between the said third and fourth tier of Lots to the northerly side line of said Waterford; thene south Sixty-five degrees West, six hundred and forty Rods on a new Township, called Oxford to a Stake and Stones; then North, twenty five degrees West, one hundred rods on said Oxford to a Stake and Stones; then South, sixty five degrees West, six hundred and fifty rods (stll on Oxford) to a stake and stones; then south, twenty five degrees East, one hundred rods to a stake & stones; then South sixty five degrees West, three hundred and forty rods to a stone set in the Ground; then South, twenty five degrees east, one hundred and sixty rods to a stone in the Ground; the South sixty five degrees West, three hundred and fifteen rods to a stake & stones standing in the easterly side line of New Suncook; then South twenty five degrees East, by said New Suncook, two thousand and twenty rods to a pine Tree, the Southwesterly corner of said Waterford, which is the Southeasterly corner of the aforesaid New Suncook, standing in the Northerly end line of Bridgeton [sic]; then North sixty-five degrees East, di hundred and fifty rods to the Northeasterly corner of Bridgeton [sic] aforesaid; then south, twenty five degrees East, one hundred rods to the first bound”.

1798 February 27
   Phillipsburg [now Hollis] incorporated, Maine’s 117th town. [see 1753 above; and 1812 January 22 below]

1798 June 13
   East Butterfield incorporated as Hartford, Maine’s 119th town. [see 1783 above].
   Subsequent changes to Hartford’s area:
      1807 - part of Plantation 1 annexed to Hartford
      1834 March 11 - part of Chandlers Gore annexed to Hartford
      1838 February 24 - land set off to Canton
      1839 February 25 - land set off to Canton
      1850 August 8 - land set off to Canton
      1856 March 25 - land set off to Buckfield
      1862 March 11 - land set off to Buckfield

1798 June 13
   West Butterfield incorporated as Sumner, Maine’s 120th town. [see 1783 above].
   Subsequent changes to Sumner’s area:
      1828 March 20 - part of Plantation 2 annexed to Sumner
      1844 February 22 - part of Franklin annexed to Sumner
      1856 March 12 - land set off to Buckfield
      1863 February 12 - part of Franklin annexed to Sumner

1799 February 4
   Pittston incorporated, The legislative act [cha[ter 30] of this date incorporated the then plantation of Gardinerston as Pittston, whose boundary was as follows: “beginning at the north line of the town of Pownalborough, at Kennebeck [sic] River, and to run an east-north-east course, on the said north line, five miles from the said river; from thene, to run northerly, about seven miles, more or less, to the south-easterly corner of the town of Hallowell; from thence, to run west-north-west, on the south line of the said Hallowell, to the said Kennebeck [sic] River, and across said river, and running a west-north-west course on the south line of said Hallowell, five or si miles, to Cobbisconte [sic] Stream, on the west side of the said Kennebeck [sic] River; from thence, to run southerly, down the said stream and as the stream runs, to the first pond; and on said pond, or a stream, to the north line of a large lot number ten, granted by the proprietors of the Kennebeck [sic] Purchase to the late William Bowdoin, Esqr, deceased; from thence, to run an east-south-east course, on said north line of the said lot, to the said Kennebec[k] River; and from thence, southerly, down the said river, to the north line of Pownalborough aforesaid”.
   Subsequent changes to Pittston’s area:
      1803 February 17 - land set off to form Gardiner [chapter 72]
      1844 February 29 - land in Hallowell annexed to Pittston [chapter 147]
      1855 February 20 - land in Chelsea annexed to Pittston [chapter 436]
      1887 March 6 - land set ff to form West Pittston [chapter 202]

1799 April 1
   Kennebec County established from land set off from Lincoln County. The legislative act described the boundary line between the two counties as “beginning on the westerly line of the County of Hancock, at a place from which a line running west north west, shall strike the north easterly corner of the town of Harlem, from thence running south easterly, by the easterly line of said town to the southeasterly corner thereof, thence southwesterly on a strait [sic] line to the North easterly corner of Pittston, thence by the Easterly line of said Pittston to the south easterly corner thereof, thence westerly by the Southerly line of said Pittston to the South westerly corner of said Town last mentioned, thence north westerly by the Westerly line of said Pittston to the mouth of Purgatory Stream (so called), which empties itself into Cobbesecontee [sic] Stream (so called) thence west north west to the East line of the town of Monmouth, thence southerly by the East line of said Monmouth, to the Southeasterly corner thereof, thence Westerly by the Southerly line of said Monmouth, to the Westerly corner of said Town, thence West to the Easterly line of the town of Greene, thence Southerly by the Easterly line of said Greene to Androscoggen [sic] river, or the dividing line between the Counties of Cumerland and Lincoln; and that the County of Lincoln aforesaid be, and the same is hereby declared to be bounded, Northerly & Westerly by the line aforesaid”.
   Subsequent changes to the area of Kennebec County:
      1811 February 25 - During the separation of Kennebec County from Lincoln County, the boundary line divided Litchfield into two parts, one in each county. The smaller part, which was in Kennebec County, was transferred to Lincoln County.
      1812 February 29 - legislative act [chapter 160] of this date altered the boundary between Kennebec County and Lincoln County “so as to include the town of Malta [now Windsor] wholly within the said county of Kennebeck [sic], and the town of Whitefield wholly within the said county of Lincoln”
      1821 March 8 - one estate in Whitefield [in Lincoln County] annexed to Malta [now Windsor, in Kennebec County]. The effect of the legislative act [chapter 58] of this date was that “Jonathan Moody with his family and estate lying within the boundary line of the town of Whitefield, and of the county of Lincoln, be, and they are hereby set off from the town of Whitefield and the county of Lincoln, and annexed to the town of Gerry [now Windsor] and county of Kennebec”.
      1835 March 10 - Litchfield (Lincoln County) annexed to Kennebec County. The legislative act [chapter 553] of this date determined that “the town of Litchfield in the County of Lincoln, be and the same hereby is set off from said County of Lincoln, and annexed to, and made part of the County of Kennebec”.
      1907 February 21 - repeal [chapter 96] of 1821 March 8 transaction
      1840 March 6 - Wales (Lincoln County) annexed to Kennebec County. The 1840 legislative acts [chapters 5 and 37] provded that “the town of Wales in the County of Lincoln, be, and the same hereby is, set off from the said County of Lincoln, and annexed to, and made part of te Coounty of Kennebec” [chapter 5]. Chapter 27 refined Chapter 5 to say that the “Act to annex the town of Wales to the County of Kennebec, approed by the Governor the twenty-seventh day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty, shall take effect, and be in force, from and after the approval of this Act [Chapter 27]. by the Governor”, which was approed 1840 March 6.

1799 June 22
   Westerly part of Bowdoin incorporated as Thompsonborough [now Lisbon], Maine’s 121st town. [see 1725 above] The act of incorporation described the boundary as follows: “Beginning at the Northwest corner of the Town of Topsham, at Little River, and running up said Little River about one mile to what is called Bowdoin’s road; then running westward on said Road about eight or ten rods to a large pine tree, marked with the letter Q, it being the Southeast corner of what is called Whittemore’s Lot, and thence running North North-East to the North line of said Town, said line being about a center line of the said Town of Bowdoin”. [see 1802 February 20 below.] [source: Acts and Resolves of Massachusetts 1798–99, chapter 23]

1800
   Kirkland [now Hudson] settled. [see 1825 February 25 below]

1801 February 16
   Littleborough Plantation incorporated as Leeds, Maine’s 127th town. [see 1779 above] The act of incorporation described the boundary as follows: “Beginning at the Northwest corner of Greene, thence running Northerly on the Great Ameriscoggin River, to the line of Livermore, thence Easterly on the Southerly line of said Livermore, till it strikes the line of Wayne, thence Southerly to the line of Monmouth to Greene, thence Northwest to the bounds first mentioned”. [source: Acts and Resolves of Massachusetts 1800–1801, chapter 41]

1802 February 18
   Minot incorporated. [see 1769 above] “[T]he northerly part of Poland in the county of Cumberland [Poland now in Androscoggin Counnty] as described within the following bounds … [is] hereby incorporated into a separate town by the name of Minot; beginning at the south east corner of the town of Turner, at a place called the Crooked Ripples, in the Great Androscoggin River; thence by a line drawn of the middle of said river to the Great Falls, thence by the line in the Act which incorporates the said town of Poland, untill [sic] it strikes the Little Androscoggin River; thence by a line drawn on the middle of said river untill [sic] it strikes the southerly side line of Hebron, commonly called Davis’ line, to the south west corner of Turner; and thence by the line of said Turner, to the bounds first mentioned”. [see 1842 February 24 below]

1802 February 20
   Thom[p]sonborough renamed Lisbon. [see 1799 June 22 above.] [source: Acts and Resolves of Massachusetts 1800–1801, chapter 38, p. 321.]

1802 February 20
   Brownfield incorporated, Maine’s 130th town. [see 1765 above]

1802 June 10
   Pownalborough renamed Wiscasset. [see 1760 February 13 above]
The legislative act of this date [chapter 2] declared that “from and after the date of this Act, the name of the said town of Pownalborough shall cease, and the said town shall henceforth be called and known by the name of Wiscasset only”.

1802 June 23
   Plantation of Flintstown incorporated as Baldwin, Maine’s 135th town. [see 1735 above] The legislative act [1802 chapter 12, approved 23 June 1802] described the boundary as follows: “[b]eginning on the Saco river at the westerly corner of Standish, thene northeasterly on said Standish to Sebago pond; thence northerly on said pond to Muddy river-mouth; thence north, thirty-six degrees east, five hundred and twenty two rods, to Raymondtown plantation [now Raymond]; thence northwest, on said Raymondtown & Otisfield, to Bridgeton [sic]. southeasterly line; thence southwesterly by said Bridgeton [sic] to the line of Brownfield; thence south, thirty degrees east, by said Brownfield, five hundred & sixteen rods, to the easterly corner of said Brownfield; thence south sixty degrees west, on said Brownfield, three miles, to Prescott’s grant, so called [now part of Hiram]; thence south, on said Pescott’s grant, four hundred rods; thence south sixty degrees west, still on said Prescott’s grant, one mile to Saco river; then down said river to the bound first mentioned”.
   Subsequent changes to Baldwin’s boundary:
      1821 February 28 - land set off to Hiram
      1826 February 10 - land set off to Sebago
      1827 January 26 - land set off to Sebago
      1837 March 28 - land set off to Sebago
      1844 March 7 - land set off to Hiram
      1871 February 15 - land set off to Sebago

1803 February 26
   Coxhall renamed Lyman. [see 1778 March 11 above]

1804 June 23
   A petition by all 20 families living in Peabody’s Patent [see 1772 above] was granted, and the town of Gilead was incorporated, Maine’s 158th town. [source: The Smile of Providence: A History of Gilead, Maine by Howard C. Reiche Jr. and Hugh G. Chapman]

1805
   Abbot settled. [see 1827 January 31 below]

1805 February 1
   Third grant [of three; see 1795 June 24 and 1797 February 27 above] of land in Plantation No. 4 [now Greenwood]. General Court of Massachusetts to Eleazar Twitchell, John Raymond, et al., 9,000 acres in northern portion of township. [source: The Early History of Greenwood, Maine: With a History of the Alder River Ponds of Greenwood and Woodstock, Maine by Blaine Mills; edited by Amy Wight Chapman and William F. Chapman]

1805 February 23
   Pepperellborough renamed Saco. [see 1775 August 23 above]

1805 April 1 [effective date of 1805 March 4 legislative act, chapter 70]
   Oxford County established from land set off from Cumberland County. (see 1760 November 1 above]. The dividing line ran from the southeast corner of Turner to the northwest corner of Minot, then southwesterly on the line between Minot and Hebron to the southwest corner of Hebron, then northwesterly on the line between Hebron and Otisfield to the town of Norway, then westerly and northerly on the line between Otisfield and Norway ro the southeast corner of Waterford, then westerly along the line between Waterford and Otisfield to the northeast corner of Bridgton, then westerly on the northerly line of Bridgton to its northwest corner, then southerly on the westerly line of Bridgton to its southwest corner, then westerly on the north line of Baldwin and Prescott’s Grant to the Saco River, then down the middle of the river to the mouth of Great Ossipee River, then westerly by a line drawn on the middle of the Great Ossipee River to the border of New Hampshire.
   Subsequent changes to the area of Oxford County:
      1808 March 8 - Jay placed in Oxford County.
      1819 February 2 - The east line of the county was set as west line of Bingham’s Kennebec Purchase; i.e., from the southwest corner of Kingfield to the northwest corner of Township 4 in the Seventh Range of Bingham’s Purchase.
      1821 February 5 - Gore of land south of Norway annexed to Norway from Cumberland County.
      1821 February 28 - small tract southwest of Hancock Brook and Pond annexed to Hiram from Baldwin (in Cumberland County).
      1823 January 31 - [?]

1806
   Williamsburg Plantation settled. [see 1820 June 21 below]

1807 February 20
   Denmark incorporated, Maine’s 163rd town.

1807 February 20
   Porter incorporated, Maine’s 164th town.

1808 February 25
   Alfred incorporated, Maine’s 169th town.

1808 March 3
   Pownal incorporated, Maine’s 170th town. The legislative act [chapter 79] of this date divided the town of Freeport into two parts by a line described below. The portion of Freeport northwest of the line was set off to form Pownal. The line was described as follows: “Beginning at the line between said Freeport and North-Yarmouth, at the corner of the lots of land, numbered eleven and thirteen, on range A in said Freeport; then running northeasterly between the aforesaid lots, numbered eleven and thirteen, to the lot numbered twelve, on the same range; then running northwest by the aforesaid range A, to the southerly corner of the lot numbered ten; then northeast in the line between the lots numbered ten and twelve, to the lot numbered twenty-two, on range B; then northwest to the southerly corner of the lot numbered twenty; then northeast in the line between the lots numbered twenty and twenty-two, twenty-one and twenty-three, to the lot numbered twenty, on range C; then northwest to the southerly corner of the lot numbered eighteen; then northeast in the line between the lots numbered eighteen and twenty, nineteen and twenty one in said range C, to the lot numbered eighteen, on range D; then northwest to the southerly corner of the lot numbered sixteen; then northeast in the line between the lots numbered sixteen and eighteen, seventeen and nineteen, on said range D, to the lot numbered sixteen, on range E; then northwest to the southerly cornerof the lot numbered fourteen; then northwest, in the line between the lots numbered fourteen and sixteen, fifteen and seventeen, to the line between the towns of said Freeport and Durham”.
   Subsequent changes to Pownal’s area:
      1813 February 27 - Land from North Yarmouth annexed to Pownal. Pursuant to the legislative act [chapter 120] of this date, “Edmund Cleaves and William Cleaves, with their families, and about one acre of land, with the buildings standing thereon, be, and they are hereby set off from the town of North-Yarmouth, and annexed to the town of Pownal”.
      1816 February 14 - land set off to North Yarmouth

1809 March 3
   Malta incorporated. The legislative act [chapter 76] of this date incorporated the former plantation of New Waterford as the town of Malta [now Windsor] with the following boundaries: “Beginning at the southeast corner of the town of Harlem [now China], thence running westerly by said Harlem to the northeast corner of Augusta; thence southerly by said Augusta and Hallowell, six miles to the north line of Ballstown [now Whitefield]; thence east southeast about five mile and a quarter to the main branch of Sheepscut [sic] river; thence northerly up said river to the long pond; thence over said pond to the first mentioned bounds”. [see 1821 March 10 below]

1809 June 1
   Somerset County established from land set off from Kennebec County. The legislative act making the separation described the division line as “beginning on the westerly line of the county of Hancock, at the north easterly corner of Township, Number four, north of the Waldo Patent, thence running westerly on the northerly line of said Township and the town of Unity, to the northwest corner of the town of Unity aforesaid; thence, due west, to the easterly line of the town of Clinton; thence northerly by said Clinton, to the northeast corner thereof; thence westerly by the northerly line of Clinton, to Kennebeck [sic] river; thence dow the middle of said river, to the line between the towns of Waterville and Fairfield; thence westerly between the towns last mentioned, to the southwesterly corner of said Fairfield, thence westerly on a straight line, to the south easterly corner of the towbn of Mercer; thence westerly, on the southerly line of said town of Mercer, to the easterly line of the town of New-Sharon; thence northwesterly, on the north easterly line of the town of New-Sharon aforesaid, to the easterly line of the town of Farmington; thence northerly and westerly, on the easterly and northerly line of the town of Temple; thence northerly and westerly, on the easterly and northerly lne of the town of Temple, to the easterly line of the county of Oxford, and the bounds of the county by this act created on the east, shall be the line heretofore established between the Counties of Hancock and Kennebeck [sic]; and on the west by the line between the Counties of Kennebeck [sic] and Oxford; and on the north, by the line on the high land; being the boundary between the District of Maine, and the province of Lower-Canada”.
   Subsequent changes to the boundary of Somerset County:
      1811 - Township number four in the fifth range north of Waldo Patent [now Dexter] set off to Hancock County
      1812 - Township number four in the sixth range ]now Sangerville] set off to Hancock Cpunty;
      1813 February 16 - Township number four in the fourth range north of Waldo Patent [now Corinna] annexed from Hancock County
      1813 February 26 - Somerset-Kennebec line extended westerly from northwest corner of township nu9mber four to the easterly line of Clinton
      1817 June 14 - Guilford set off to Penobscot County
      1819 February 2 - Bingham’ Kennebec Purchase transferred to Somerset County
      1821 - Southeast corner of Warsaw [now Pittsfield] set off to Twenty-five Mile Pond Plantation
      1823 January 31 - portion of Oxford County near western boundary of Somerset County set off to Somerset County
      1830 March 6 - two lots set off from Pittsfield to Clinton (Kennebec County)
      1833 February 10 - Corinna set off to Penobscot County
      1838 March 23 - land set off to form part of Piscataquis County
      1838 March 20 - land set off to form part of Franklin County:
      1840 February 29 - part of Dearborn (Kennebec County) set off to form part of Smithfield
      1840 - two estates annexed to Anson from New Vineyard [Franklin County]
      1841 - land in Mercer set off to New Sharon (Franklin County)
      1842 - northern and western boundary of Someset County as a result of Treaty of Washington
      1844 February 29 - Plymouth set off to Penobscot County
      1844 March 12 - Seboomook and Little W annexed from Piscataquis County
      1844 March 12 - land set off to Aroostook County
      1849 July 24 - one estate annexed to Canaan from Clinton (Kennebec County)
      1873 - Bunker’s Island annexed to Fairfield from Benton (Kennebec County)
      1883 March 13 - Piscataquis-Somerset line corrected
      1885 - two lots annexed to Cambridge from Wellington (Piscataquis County)

1810 March 1
   Eliot incorporated. Land set off from Kittery [see 1810 March 1 under 1647 October 20 above] to form Eliot, which was incorporated at the same time, as Maine’s 178th town. The legislative act [chapter 74] described the portion of Kittery set off as “all that part of the town of Kittery in the county of York, included within the limits of the second parish in said town”.
   Subsequent changes to Eliot’s area:
      1826 February 8 - part of Kittery to be set off to Eliot, but repealed
      1829 February 7 - same part of Kittery [see 1829 February 7 under 1647 October 20 above] set off to Eliot. The legislative act approved on this date [chapter 14] involved only “Washington Remick, with his poll and the estate, which he owns in the town of Kittery”. This act also repealed the act of 1826 February 8.

1812
   Greenfield Plantation settled. [see 1834 January 29 below]

1812 January 22
   Phillipsburg renamed Hollis. [see 1798 February 27 above]

1812 February 6
   Bingham incorporated, Maine’s 188th town. The legislative act of incorporation described the town as “township Number one, in the first range of townships within the Bingham purchase”, and that it was “bounded south by the town of Solon, east by number two in the range aforesaid, north by number one in the second range, east of Kennebeck [sic] River, and west by Kennebeck [sic] River”.

1812 February 22
   Kingville established, Maine’s 189th town. The legislative act of incorporation [the term “established” used instead of “incorporated”] described the town as “township numbered four in the first range of townships, north of the Waldo Patent”, and “the whole of the said town of Kingville be … annexed to the county of Kennebeck [sic]”. [For details, see the text of the law as follows: page 1 (of 1)] [see 1815 March 1 below]

1814
   Conflicting claims from the 1684 July 7 deed settled by the Genral Court of Massachusetts. (see 1683 above and 1684 July 7 above]

1814 January 26
   Phippsburg incorporated. Land set off from the town of Georgetown [1716 June 13 above] and incorporated as Phippsburgh [now spelled Phippsburg], Maine’s 199th town. The legislative act of incorporation describes the land set off as being “all that part of the town of Georgetown, situate on the west side of Kennebec river”.
   Subsequent changes to Phippsburg’s area:
      1840 March 7 - boundary with Bath established
      1891 February 5 - part set off to Harpswell
      1903 March 28 - various islands annexed [from ?]
      1905 March 15 - various islands set off [to ?]
      1917 March 19 - various islands annexed [from ?]

1814 February 5
   Bloomfield incorporated, Maine’s 202nd town. The legislative act of this date [chapter 94] incorporated as Bloomfield “all that part of the town of Canaan, lying west of Kennebeck [sic] river, in the county of Somerset, as described by the following bounds, be, and hereby is established as a separate town, by the name of Bloomfield, viz, Easterly by a line dran on the middle of Kennebeck [sic] river, including all the islands belonging to the jurisdiction of the town of Canaan by its act of incorporation, (excepting Oaks’ Island) and northerly, westerly and southerly by its present bounds”.
   Subsequent changes to Bloomfield’s area:
      1858 February 22 - land from Fairfield annexed to Bloomfield [chapter 156]
      1861 February 19 - Bloomfield annexed to Skowhegan [chapter 34]

1814 February [5 or 12?]
   South Berwick incorporated, Maine’s 203rd town. Land set off from the town of Berwick [1713 June 9 above] and incorporated as South Berwick.
   Subsequent changes to South Berwick’s area:
      1834 February 15 - part of York annexed. [see 1834 February 15 under 1652 November 22] The legislative act of this date [chapter 443] annexed to South Berwick “all that part of said town of York, which lies Northwestwardly of the following described line, beginning at a rock, where the towns of South Berwick, York, and Eliot unite in a corner—thence running North fifty eight degrees East to the Southwest line of the town of Wells at a stake where said line is intersected by a road leading from Cape Neddock [sic] in York to Richard Littlefield’s house in Wells, which said stake is eight hundred and sixty seven rods from Bakers spring so called”.
      1841 March 18 - part of Berwick annexed
      1881 February 5 - part of Berwick annexed

1814 February 14
   Stroudwater [now Westbrook] incorporated. Land set off from the town of Falmouth [see 1658 July 14 above] and incorporated as Stroudwater [now Westbrook], Maine’s 204th town. The legislative act [chapter 119] described the land set off and incorporated as being “all that part of the town of Falmouth, in the county of Cumberland, which lies south westerly of the following described line, viz. beginning at a small white oak tree standing on a point of land in the field of Crispus Graves, and on the bank of Presumpscott [sic] river, and on a course northwest from a tree standing at high water mark, on the most westerly end of Machay’s Island; thence from said white oak tree, northwest five hundred and sixty rods and nineteen links, to a stake standing three rods and four links in front of Charles Frost’s dwelling house; thence continuing the same course nine hundred and nineteen rods, to a stake standing on the bank of the outlet of the Duck pond; thence continuing the same course to the dividing line between said Falmouth and the town of Windham”. [see 1814 June 9 below]
   Subsequent changes to Stroudwater’s [Westbrook’s] area:
      1819 February 4 - land set off to Falmouth
      1825 January 31 - land from Falmouth annexed to Westbrook. The legislative act [chapter 297] determined that because “Daniel Shaw, whose dwelling house and farm on which he now lives, is divided by the division line between the towns of Falmouth and Westbrook, in the County of Cumberland…[that he] together with his poll and such part of his said farm as now lies in the town of Falmouth, be, and hereby is set off and annexed to the town of Westbrook”.
      1828 February 11 - land set off to Falmouth
      1831 March 22 - land set off to Falmouth
      1835 February 24 - land from Falmouth annexed to Westbrook. By the legislative act of this date [chapter 542], it was determined that “Samuel Lord together with his Farm on which he now lives, be, and the same hereby are set off from the town of Falmouth and annexed to the town of Westbrook”.
      1836 March 21 - land from Falmouth annexed to Westbrook. The legislative act [chapter 140] of this date determined that “George Hussey, together with his farm on which he now lives be and the same hereby are set off from the town of Falmouth and annexed to the town of Westbrook”.
      1845 April 3 - land set off to Portland [chapter 279]
      1852 April 19 - land from Cape Elizabeth annexed to Westbrook [chapter 605]
      1853 March 25 - land from Falmouth annexed to Westbrook. The legislative act [chapter 130] of this date determined that “[s]o much of the farms of William Gowen, Peter Gowen, and David H. Gowen, as now is situated in the town of Falmouth, hereby is set off from the said town of Falmouth and annexed to and made a part of the town of Westbrook”.
      1871 February 16 - land set off to form Deering [chapter 628]

1814 June 9
   Stroudwater renamed Westbrook. The legislative act [chapter 15] determined that “the name of the town of Stroudwater, in the counnty of Cumberland, be, and the same hereby is altered to the name of Westbrook”. [see 1814 February 14 above]

1814 June 14
   Hiram incorporated, Maine’s 207th town. 1774 above]

1815 March 1
   Kingville renamed Joy. [see 1812 February 22 above and 1826 January 23 below] The law of this date (chapter 151) both changed the name of Kingville to Joy and changed its western boundary. [For details, see the text of the law as follows: page 1 (of 1)]

1816 February 1
   Wales incorporated, Maine’s 212th town. [see 1773 above]
   Subsequent changes to Wales’s area:
      1827 January 20 - part of Litchfield annexed
      1828 January 31 (amended 1828 February 23) - part of Litchfield annexed
      1843 March 22 - boundary between Wales and Greene established
      1855 March 16 - part of Leeds annexed
      1855 March 16 - part of Monmouth annexed
      1856 March 12 - part of Litchfield annexed
      1867 February 14 - part set off to Webster [now Sabattus]

1816 April 1
   Penobscot County established from land set off from Hancock County. The legislative act described the area of the new county to be “all that territory in the county of Hancock, which lies north of the Waldo Patent, on the west side of Penobscot river, and north and west of the following lines on the east side of said river: Beginning at said river, at the south line of Orrington, Brewer, and the Gore east of Brewer, to the west line of the Bingham prchase; thence northerly by said Bingham purchase, to the northwest corner thereof; thence easterly on the north line of said Bingham purchase, to the county of Washington”.
   Subsequent changes to the boundary of Penobscot County:
      1816 June 17 - land in Bucksport (Hancock County) annexed to Orrington
      1816 June 17 - one estate in Frankfort (Hancock County( annexed to Hampden
      1817 June 14 - Guilford (Somerset County) annexed to Penobscot County
      1817 June 14 - all of Foxcroft annexed to Penobscot County
      1831 March 15 - annexed to Penobscot County, a tract in Washington County with boundary as follows: “on the north and east by the northeastern boundary of the state, and on the south by the north line of township F [now Caswell] and Township K [now Connor], thence north by the east line of township sixten in the third range [now Stockholm], and west on the north line of township sixteen to the original east line of Penobscot County”
      1833 February 10 - Corinna (Somerset County) annexed to Penobscot County
      1835 - part of Bingham’s Penobscot Purchase set off to Burlington
      1838 March 23 - part set off to Piscataquis County
      1839 March 16 - part set off to Aroostook County
      1841 February 20 - Page’s Mills Settlement (Hancock County) annexed to Lowell
      1841 February 20 - land from Bucksport (Hancock County) and Dedham (Hancock County) annexed to Brewer
      1842 August 9 - Saint John River became northern bounday
      1843 March 21 - land set off to Aroostook County
      1884 February 29 - western bounday adjustment
      1884 February 29 - Plymouth annexed to Penobscot Couunty
      1884 March 12 - boundary adjustment with Washington County and Piscataquis County
      1850 August 20 - land from Bucksport (Hancock County) set off to Orrington
      1858 March 15 - Greenfield, township number one, and township number two annexed to Penobscot County
      1889 March 5 - land in Drew Plantation north of Mattawamkeag River set off to Reed Plantation (Aroostook County)

1820 June 19
   North line of Alna established. The legislative act described the “southward line of the town of Whitfield [sic], on the westward side of Sheepscot river, [to begin] at an elm tree, a corner of Whitfield [sic], on said river; from thence west northwest, one mile and eighty poles to Pittston line” and that the town of Alna would “ extend to, and be bounded on, the said line of the town of Whitfield [sic]”.

1820 June 21
   Williamsburg Plantation (Township 6, range 8, as surveyed by Samuel Weston, in 1794) incorporated as Williamsburg, Maine’s 237th town. [see 1806 above] The legislative act of incorporation described the new town as “bounded by the town of Sebec, east by the plantation of Brownville [now the town of Brownville], north by township number six in the ninth range, and west by township number seven in the eighth range”. [see 1939 February 8 below]
   Subsequent changes to Williamsburg’s area:
      1834 February 8 - land set off to form the town of Barnard, which was incorporated on the same day, as Maine’s 313th town.

1820 July 31
   Kennebunk incorporated. Land set off from Wells [see 1820 July 31 under 1653 July 5 above] to form Kennebunk, which was incorporated at the same time, as Maine’s 238th town. The legislative act [chapter 5, approved 1820 June 14 with an effective date of 1820 July 31] described the portion of Wells thus set off as being “all that part of the town of Wells, in the county of York, lying northeasterly of the following line, viz.: begining at the sea, at the mouth of Little river; thence running up the middle of said river to the mouth of the Branch river; thence p the middle of said Branch river, to the line between said Wells and Sanford”.
   Subsequent change to Kennebunk’s area:
      1868 February 21 - land set off to Wells

1821 February 19
   Arundel [see 1719 June 10 above] renamed Kennebunkport

1821 March 10
   Malta renamed Gerry. [see 1809 March 3 above] The legislative act [chapter 63] of this date specified that “from and after the passing of this act, the name of the said town of Malta shall cease, and the said town shall henceforth be called and known by the name of Gerry”. [see 1822 January 19 below]

1821 April 2
   Cumberland incorporated. Land set off from North Yarmouth and incorporated as Cumberland, Maine’s 242nd town. The legislative act [chapter 78] was passed on 1821 March 19 with an effective date of 1821 April 2. A line dividing North Yarmouth into two parts is described below. Land of North Yarmouth on the southwest side of the line became Cumberland. The line was described as follows: “beginning at the sea shore on the dividing line betwen the farms of Alexander Barr and Reuben Loring; thence northwesterly to the easterly corner of the one hundred and twenty acre lot numbered one, in the one hundred and twenty acre division, on the west side of Royal’s river; thence north twenty-six degrees west to the north corner of lot numbered five; thence south sixty-four degrees west on the dividing line between the lots numbered five and six, to the south corner of land now owned by Joseph Barstow, in lot numbered six; thence north twenty-six degrees west, across said lot; thence south sixty-four degrees west, between lots numbered six and seven, to the dividing line between the one hundred and the one hundred and twenty acre division on the west side of Royal’s river; thence north twenty-six degrees west on said line to the southeasterly side line of the two hundred and eighty acre squadron numbered one thence south fifty four degrees west to the easterly corner of the four hundred and fifty acre squadron numbered two, so called; thence northwest to Gray line, with all the flats lying westerly of a line drawn south, twelve degrees east from the bounds first mentioned, together with all the islands heretofore belonging to said town of north-Yarmouth, except Cousins’ island, Littlejohn’s island, Lane’s island, and the two islands called Mosier’s and Little Mosier’s islands”.
   Subsequent changes to Cumberland’s area:
      1889 February 14 - an island set off to Portland [chapter 355]

1822 January 15
   Town of Harlem annexed to China.

1822 January 19
   Dover incorporated, Maine’s 244th town. The act of incorporation of Dover described Plantation 3, Range 6, which became Dover, as bounded “south by the town of Garland, east by the town of Atkinson, north by the town of Foxcroft, and west by the town of Sangerville”.

1822 January 19
   Gerry renamed Windsor. [see 1821 March 10 above] The legislative act [chapter 95] of this date specified that “from and after the passing of this Act, the name of the town of Gerry, in the county of Kennebec, shall cease, and the said town shall henceforth be called and known by the name of Windsor”.

1824
   T11 R1 WELS [now Cary Plantation] settled.

1824 June 3
   East Andover [now Andover] incorporated, Maine’s 273rd town. [see 1780 above and 1830 June 13 below]

1825 February 25
   Kirkland [now Hudson] incorporated. [see 1800 above] The legislative act of incorporation gave the boundary of Kirkland to be “beginning at the corner of the towns of Dutton [now Glenburn], Levant and Corinth; thence north by Corinth, to the southwest corner of Blakesburgh; thence east to the southeast corner of Blakesburgh; thence south to the northeast corner of Dutton [now Glenburn]; thence west on the north line of Dutton [now Glenburn] to the place of beginning”. [see 1855 March 17 below]

1826 January 23
   Joy renamed Montgomery. [see 1815 March 1 above and 1827 February 10 below] The law of this date (chapter 363) changed the name of Joy to Montgomery. [For details, see the text of the law as follows: page 1 (of 1)]

1826 February 10
   Sebago incorporated. Land set off from Baldwin and incorporated as Sebago, Maine’s 268th town. [see 1790 above]

1827 January 31
   Liberty incorporated, Maine’s 272nd town. The legislative act of incorporation [chapter 444] of this date specified that “the Plantation called and known by the name of Montville, in the county of Lincoln, bounded southweswardly and northwestwardly by the northeastwardly line of the town of Palermo, continued till they meet; northeastwardly by the town of Montville, and southeastwardly by a line from the southwardly corner of said town of Montville to the northwardly corner of said town of Washington, be incorporated into a town by the name of Liberty”. A subsequent legislative act [chapter 342, approved by the Governor, Feb. 17, 1827]

1827 January 31
   Abbot incorporated, Maine’s 273rd town. [see 1805 above]

1827 February 10
   Montgomery renamed Troy. [see 1826 January 23 above] The law of this date (chapter 468) changed the name of Montgomery to Trot. [For details, see the text of the law as follows: page 1, page 2]

1827 July 3
   Waldo County established. The legislative act, approved by the Governor on 1827 February 7, with an effective date of 1827 July 3, determined that the new county be composed of “all that portion of the present territory of the county of Hancock which lies westward of the Penobscot bay and river, with the town of Islesborough in said county, and the towns of Camden, Hope, Montville, and Palermo, and the plantations of Appleton and Montville, in the county of Lincoln, and the towns of Freedom, Unity, Montgomery and Burnham in the county of Kennebec”. [For details, see the entire text of the nine-page law as follows: page 1, page 2, page 3, page 4, page 5, page 6, page 7, page 8, page 9]
   Subsequent changes to the boundary of Waldo County:
      1836 February 10 - one estate annexed to Camden from Warren (Lincoln County). The legislative act [chapter 17] apoproved on this date provided that “Nathaniel Carril together with his farm, on which he now lives, and which is bounded as follows; to wit, begnning at a stake and stones on the Town line of said Camden, thence running South fifty six degrees West, about forty rods to a stake and stones to land of William Gregory, thence North thirty four degrees West two hundred and sixty rods to said Camden line, thence by said Town line to the bounds first mentioned;—be, and the same are, hereby, set off from the town of Warren, County of Lincoln, and annexed to the Town of Camden and County of Waldo”.
      1838 March 15 - Vinalhaven annexed from Hancock County
      1854 April 11 - three homesteads set off from Palermo to Washington (Lincoln County)
      1860 Apri 1 - Appleton, Camden, Hope, North Haven, and Vinalhaven set off to form part of Knox County
      1873 - part of Clinton Gore Plantation (Kennebec County) annexed to Burnham

1829 January 28
   Appleton Plantation incorporated as Appleton, Maine’s 283rd town. [see 1775 above] The legislative act of incorporation described the new town as “bounded southerly by the towns of Union and Washington, easterly by the town of Hope, westerly by the town of Liberty, and northerly by the towns of Searsmont and Montville”.
   Subsequent change to Appleton’s area:
      1843 February 7 - part of Hope annexed

1829 February 27
   Oxford incorpofated, Maine’s 285th town. Oxford was formed from land set off from Hebron as follows: “so much of the town of Hebron, in the County of Oxford, as lies south west of Matthews’ Pond, so called, and the inlet of said Pond, running from Paris, and the outlet of the same Pond running into Minot”.
   Subsequent changes to Oxford’s area:
      1830 March 17 - land from Otisfield annexed to Oxford [chapter 115]
      1838 March 8 - land from Paris annexed to Oxford [chapter 439]

1830 March 6
   Acton incorporated, Maine’s 286th town. Part of Shapleigh [see 1785 March 5 above] set off to form Acton, which was incorporated on the same day.
   Subsequent change to Acton’s area:
      1831 March 22 - land set off to Shapleigh

1830 June 13
   East Andover renamed Andover. [see 1824 June 3 above]

1831 March 12
   Bradford incorporated. The Plantation of Blakesburg, also “township number one, in the fifth range in the County of Penobscot”, which was incorporated as Bradford, was described in the legislative act of incorporation as being bounded “Westerly by Charleston, Southerly by Kirkland [now Hudson], Northerly by township number one, in the sixth range in said County, and Easterly by townships numbers two and three”.

1831 March 22
   North Berwick incorporated. Land set off from Berwick [see 1713 June 9 above] and incorporated as North Berwick, Maine’s 294th town.
   Subsequent change to North Berwick’s area:
      1875 February 22 - part of Berwick annexed to North Berwick

1833 February 28
   Milford incorporated, Maine’s 308th town. Sunkhaze Plantation (Township 3 on east side of Penobscot River), which was incorporated as Milford, was described by the legislative act of incorporation as being “bounded on the West by the Penobscot River, on the North by Township No. 2, on the East by west line of Lottery township, and on the South by Township No. 4”.

1834 January 29
   Greenfield Plantation (Township 38 on Bingham Purchase) incorporated, Maine’s 310th town. The legislative act of incorporation described the area of Greenfield as “bounded on the West by Milford, on the North by Township No. 1, on the East by Township No. 39, and on the South by Township No. 32”. [See 1812 above]

1834 February 28
   Township No. 2 on east side of Penobscot River incorporated as Greenbush, Maine’s 317th town. The legislative act of incorporation described the new town as “bounded west by the Penobscot river, North by township numbered One, East by the Bingham Purchase, and South by Milford”.

1835 January 31
   Enfield incorporated, Maine’s 320th town. The act of incorporation described the newly incorporated area as “Township No. One Old Indian purchase, east of Penobscot River”.

1835 January 31
   Edinburg incorporated, Maine’s 321st town. The act of incorporation referred to the new town as the former “River Township No. One in the sixth Range of Townships West of the Penobscot River Old Indian Purchase”.

1835 January 31
   Passadumkeag incorporated. Township No. One Old Indian purchase, East of Penobscot River, incorporated as Passadumkeag, Maine’s 322nd town.
   A subsequent change to the area of Passadumkeag:
      1842 March 17 - part set off to Lowell, specifically “[a]ll that part of the town of Passadumkeag situated east of a line drawn due north from the northwest corner of Bingham’s Penobscot purchase, and being bounded on the north by the town of Enfield, east and south by the town of Lowell”.

1838 April 30
   Piscataquis County established. The legislative act described the area of the new county to be “all that portion of territory lying north of the south lines of Parkman and Wellington, to the County of Somerset, and lying north of the north lines of the towns of Dexter, Garland, Charleston, Bradford, and south line of Kilmarnock, in the County of Penobscot; and bounded east by the east lines of Milton, Kilmarnock and townships numbered four in the eighth and ninth ranges; and thence bounded east by a line runnng north, from the northeast corner of said townshi numbered four in the ninth range, to the north line of the State; and bounded on the west by the west lines of Wellington, Kingsbery [sic], Shirley and township number two in the fifth range; and thence bounded west by a line running north, from the northwest corner of said township number two to the Kennebec River; thence up and by the southerly bank of said river to Moose Head Lake; thence bounded westerly by the westerly margin of said Lake, to the northwest angle of said Lake—and thence bounded west by a line running north, to the north line of the State“.
   Subsequent changes to the boundary of Piscataquis were:
      1842 - Treaty of Washington
      1844 - a more or less even exchange of land with Penobscot County
      1883 March 13 - boundary correction with Somerset County
      1885 February 27 - two lots set off from Wellington to Cambridge (Somerset County)

1838 May 9
   Franklin County established. It was composed of “the towns of New Sharon, Chesterville, Wilton, Temple and Farmington in the County of Kennebec; and Jay, Carthage, Weld, Berlin, Madrid, Townships numbered six, Letter E, and D, in the County of Oxford, thence extending northerly from the north-west corner of Letter D. on the line betwixt Townships numbered three and four, through the several ranges of Townships to Canada line, so as to include three tiers of Townships west of the west line of the Bingham Purchase in said County of Oxford; and Industry, New Vineyard, Strong, Avon, Phillips, Freeman, Salem, Kingfield, Townships numbered four in the first Range west of Kingfield, three and four in the second Range and the south half of Township numbered four in the third Range of the Bingham Purchase in the County of Somerset”.
   After passage by the legislature and being approved on 20 March 1838 by the Governor, the provisions of the law would “not go into operation and become a law unless a majority of the legal voters who shall vote on said question within the limits of the proposed new county, and persons in unorganized plantations who would be entitled to vote for senators, were such plantations organized, who shall have the privilege of voting in towns or organized plantations in the vicinty of such [un]organized plantations, shall vote in favor of the same”.
   Subsequent changes to the area of Franklin County were:
      1840 March 18 - Two estates set off from New Vineyard to Anson (in Somerset County).
      1841 April 6 - a small tract from the western corner of Mercer (in Somerset County) annexed to New Sharon.
      1842 - Treaty of Washington resulted in a change of state boundary which meant a more-or-less V-shape parcel (approximate size: one township) lost from Franklin County.
      1847 - Three lots annexed to Chesterville from Vienna (in Kennebec County).
      1852 April 9 - Chesterville-Vienna line determined, with unknown effect on area of Frankln County.

1839 March 19
   Argyle incorporated, Maine’s 346th town. According to the legislative act of incorporation, the newly incorporated area was composed of “so much of the plantation of Argyle in the County of Penobscot, as lies east of the Birch stream and its main or west branch, bounded north by the town of Lagrange and Edinburg, east by Penobscot river, south by the town of Orono, and west by said Birch stream”.

1839 May 1
   Aroostook County established. The legislative act creating the county described it as being composed of all the land in Maine “lying north of the north line of the fourth Range of townships north of the Lottery townships, and east of the dividing line between Ranges five and six west of the east line of the State and of a line from the north termination of the said dividing line and running the same course, to the north line of the State”.
   Subsequent changes to the area of Aroostook County were:
      1842 August 9 - The St. John River became the northern boundary of the state (and the county).
      1843 March 21 - The land north of township eight in the sixth range, eight in the seventh range, and eight in the eighth range of townships west of the east line of the state was annexed from Penobscot County.
      1844 March 12 - annexed from Piscataquis County and Somerset County was the land “bounded on the south by a line bebginning at the northwest corner of township eight in the eighth range of townships west from the east line of the state; thence north to a point. due westfrom the northwest corner of township numbered ten in the seventh range of townships west from the east line of the state; thence west to the west line of the state”.
      1885 - a small tract was set off to Danforth (in Washington County) from Weston.
      1889 March 5 - all land in Drew Plantation north of the Mattawamkeag River annexed to Reed Plantation.
      1903 March 28 - land formerly in Drew Plantation north of the Mattawamkeag River (see 1889 March 5 immediately above) returned to Drew Plantation.

1840 March 7
   Webster [now Sabattus] incorporated, Maine’s 349th town. The act of incorporation described the bounday of Webster to be “all that part of the town of Lisbon, which lies north of Davis’ south line, so called”. [see 1774 above and 1971 May 13 below]

1841 March 2
   Arrowsic incorporated; Maine’s 352nd town. [see 1625 above] The original act of incorporation was passed on 17 February 1841, but a subsequent act stated that the first act “incorporating the town of Arrowsic, shall go into effect and become a law, from and after the time this Act shall have been approved by the Governor” [2 March 1841].

1842 February 24
   Auburn incorporated, Maine’s 356th town. The new town was composed of “that part of the town of Minot lying easterly of the curve line, so called”. [see 1786 above]
   Subsequent changes to Auburn’s area:
      1859 February 19 - part of Danville annexed
      1867 February 26 - remainder of Danville annexed
      1873 February 20 - part of Minot annexed to Auburn
(sources: Private and Special Laws of the State of Maine 1842, chapter 9 | Attwood, Stanley Bearce. 2004. The Length and Breadth of Maine)

1844 March 1
   East Livermore [now Livermore Falls] incorporated, Maine’s 361st town. The new town was composed of “[a]ll that part of Livermore in the county of Oxford, on the east side of the Androscoggin river”. Also effective on 1844 March 1,"Said town of East Livermore shall be annexed to and be a part of, the county of Kennebec”. [see 1929 March 15 below]

1848 July 28
   East Thomaston incorporated. The legislative act [chapter 131] of this date incorporated two towns: East Thomaston [described here] and South Thomaston [described immediately below]. The boundary for East Thomaston was described as “[a]ll that part of the town of Thomaston lying northeasterly and easterly of a line commencing at the line of the town of Warren at the westerly corner of the company lots so called; thence on the line of said company lots south fifty-eight degrees and thirty minutes east, and continuing the same course to the west branch of Mill River stream; thence southwesterly down said branch to the northerly line of Aruna Robbins’ land; thence southeasterly by said Robbins’ northeasterly line to the meadow brook so called; thence down said meadow brook to the middle of the town road crossing the meadow; thence southeasterly on said road and contnuing the course thereof to a point twenty rods southeasterly of the highway; thence northeasterly to a point in the easterly line of said highway intersected by the centre line of the town road leading from near the dwelling-house of Ephraim Ulmer to East Thomaston village; thence southeasterly by the middle of said town road to the easterly line of the Blackinton farm so called; thence by said line southerly to the easterly angle of said Blackinton farm; thence in a direct line southerly to a point in the marsh brook intersected by the north line of the road near William Butler’s house; thence down said brook to a point therein intersected by the north line of the Job Ingraham lot so called, extended; thence north seventy-nine degrees east by said north line of the Ingraham lot extended, to the shore of Owl’s Head bay, reference being had to the survey and plan made by Edwin Ross for said town”.

1848 July 28
   South Thomaston incorporated. The legislative act [chapter 131] of this date incorporated two towns: East Thomaston [described immediately above] and South Thomaston [described here]. The boundary for South Thomaston was described as “[a]ll that part of Thomaston lying southerly of Owl’s Head bay and of a line commencing at the bay of George’s river at the north line of Washington Robbins’ land; thence south eighty-eight degrees east by said Robbins’ north line, extended to the marsh brook; thence up said marsh brook to a point intersected by the north line of the Job Ingraham lot so called, extended; thence south eighty-eight degrees east by said north line of Job Ingraham lot to the shore of Owl’s Head bay, together with all that part of Thomaston lying southerly of said Owl’s Head bay and the adjacent islands now constituting a part of said town”.

1849 August 20
   Yarmouth incorporated, Maine’s 380th town. The legislative act [chapter 264] of 1849 August 8 [effective on 1849 August 20] divided North Yarmouth into two parts by a line described as follows: “beginning at a point on the Greely road, where the lands of Levi Blanchard and Reuben Blanchard meet on said road; thence by the west and north lines of Levi Blanchard’s land to the land of Joseph Barstow; thence by the west and north lines of said Barstow’s land to the New Gloucester road; thence by a straight course to the northwestern corner of Amos Corliss’ farm; thence by the line between said Corliss’l farm and the farm of Enoch F. Bearce to Royall’s [sic] river; thence by said river and the northern line of Samuel Baker’s land to the north road; thence by a straight course to the point on the Pownal road where the line between the lands of Samuel Parker and Samuel G. Russell crosses said road; thence by said road to the line of the town of Pownal”. The portion of North Yarmouth lying south of the above-described line became the newly incorporated town of Yarmouth. Two provisions are found in the legislative act. Section 6 says “All persons dwelling on lands now owned by them which are cut by the boundary line herein described, shall have liberty to belong, with their said lands, and their families, to which of said towns they may elect”; and section 7 stipulates that “[i]n any case where the boundary line between said towns shall be by a highway or town way, the whole of said way contiguous to such part of the line, shall be within the limits of the town of Yarmouth”.

1854 March 31
   Androscoggin County established. It was composed of towns taken from four counties: Cumberland (Auburn, Danvile [now part of Auburn], Durham, Minot, and Poland); Kenebec (East Livermore, Greene, Leeds, and Wales); Lincoln (Lewiston, Lisbon, and Webster [now Sabattus]); and Oxford (Livermore and Turner).
   Subsequent changes to the area of Androscoggin County were:
      1855 - land annexed to Wales from Monmouth (in Kennebec County)
      1856 - land annexed to Wales from Litchfield (in Kennebec County)
      1858 - land set off from Poland to Otisfield (then in Cumberland County, now in Oxford County)
      1858 - land set off from Poland to Casco (In Cumberland County)
      1859 - land set off from Leeds to Wayne (in Kennebec County)
      1867 - land annexed to Webster [now Sabattus] from Litchfield (in Kenebec County)
      1893 March 22 - An additional change, though neither increasing nor decreasing the land area of Androscoggin County, was the creation of the town of Mechanic Falls, which was composed of land from Minot and Poland.

1854 April 1
   Sagadahoc County established. The legislative act [chapter 70] of this date declared that the “towns of Arrowsic, Bowdoin, Bowdoinham, Georgetown, Woolwich, Perkins, Phipsburg [sic], Richmond, Topsham, West Bath and the city of Bath, all in the county of Lincoln, be and the same are hereby constituted and made a county by the name of Sagadahoc”.
   Subsequent change to the area of Sagadahoc County:
      Ragged Island (in Phippsburg) set off to Harpswell (in Cumberland County [chapter 25]
1854 April 7
   Dayton incorporated, Maine’s 391st town. [see 1753 above]

1855 February 1
   Biddeford incorporated as a city. [see 1653 July 5 above]

1855 March 17
   Kirkland renamed Hudson. [see 1825 February 25 above]

1860 April 1
   Knox County established. The law (chapter 186) was approved by the House of Representatives and by the Senate on 9 March 1860, and it contained the provision that the act would “take effect on the first day of April, eighteen hundred and sixty”. The new county was composed of towns taken from two counties: Lincoln (Cushing, Friendship, Matinicus Island Plantation, Muscle Ridge Plantation, Rockland, Saint George, South Thomaston, Thomaston, Union, Warren, and Washington); and Waldo (Appleton, Camden, Hope, North Haven, and Vinalhaven). [For details, see the entire text of the four-page law as follows: page 1, page 2, page 3, page 4]
   Only one subsequent change affected the land area of Knox county.
      1913 March 12 - Isle au Haut was annexed to Knox County from Hancock County. The one-page law (chapter 83) can be seen here.
   Additional changes, though neither increasing nor decreasing the area of Knox County, were:
      1878 February 7 - incorporation of Hurricane Isle, formerly part of Vinalhaven (but see 1921 March 29 below)
      1891 February 25 - the creation of the town of Rockport, which was composed of land from Camden
      1897 March 3 - incorporation of Criehaven Plantation, from part or Matinicus Isle Plantation (but see 1925 March 9)
      1921 March 29 - repeal of incorporation of Hurricane Island and its return to Vinalhaven in 1937
      1921 July 9 - the creation of Owl’s Head, which was composed of land from South Thomaston
      1925 March 9 - Criehaven Plantation deorganized, and today is called Criehaven Township.

1872
   Plantation Letter K R2 [WELS] [now Connor Township] organized. [see 1877 below]

1877
   Plantation Letter K R2 [WELS] renamed Connor Plantation. (see 1872 above; see 1913 July 12 below)

1883 February 20
   Old Orchard Beach incorporated, Maine’s 447th town. [see 1631 above]

1893 March 22
   Mechanic Falls incorporated, Maine’s 456th town. Mechanic Falls was created from one part each from Minot and Poland. The Minot portion was “[t]hat portion of the town … lying westerly of the following described line: beginning at the mouth of Bog brook, so called, thence up said brook to Gardner brook, so called, thence up said Gardner brook to the Oxford town line”; and from Poland, “all that portion of the town … lying northerly and easterly of the following described line: beginning at the point where the Oxford town line crosses Winter brook, so called, thence up said brook to the outlet of Tripp pond, so called, thence easterly in a straight line to the forks of the road north of A. D. Garland’s dwelling house, thence by the southerly side of the road leading to Mechanic Falls to the Cousins brook, thence down said brok to the Waterhouse brook, thence easterly in a straight line to the southerly corner of the Alanson Briggs farm, thence northeasterly by the lot line to Little Androscoggin river”.

1895 March 15
   Land set off from Cape Elizabeth [see 1775 August 23 above] and incorporated as South Portland, Maine’s 459th town.

1913 March 10–12
   “An Act [chapter 83] to Set Off the Town of Isle au Haut from the County of Hancock and Annex the Same to the County of Knox” was passed by the House of Representatives on March 10, by the Senate on March 11, and was signed by the Governor on March 12.

1913 July 12
   Connor Plantation incorporated as Connor, Maine’s 479th town. [see 1877 above; see 1945 below]

1929 March 15
   East Livermore renamed Livermore Falls. effective date: “upon acceptance…of the voters”) [see 1843 March 20 above]

1939 February 8
   Williamsburg’s incorporation repealed. [see 1820 June 21 above]

1945
   Incorporation of Connor repealed; name becomes Connor Township. (see 1913 July 12 above)

1971 [May 13?]
   Webster renamed Sabattus. [see 1840 March 7]

1980 July 1
   Ogunquit incorporated.

1997 June 12
   Frye Island incorporated. Land set off from Standish [see 1785 November 30 above] and incorporated as the town of Frye Island.



Below is an alphabetical list of Maine’s counties for which one or more towns have deeds posted on this website. Click on any county and you will be taken to a list of those towns.

Androscoggin County
Cumberland County
Hancock County
Oxford County






ANDROSCOGGIN COUNTY

Durham



CUMBERLAND COUNTY

New Gloucester
Scarborough



HANCOCK COUNTY

Mount Desert Island



KENNEBEC COUNTY

Litchfield



OXFORD COUNTY

Canton



YORK COUNTY

Eliot
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