Mysteries of Mount Desert Island

part of the
Champlain Project - 183 Pleasant Street, Apartment 1 - Canton, Maine  04221
info@vfthomas.com


(updated 18 June 2011)

Welcome to the Mysteries page. From time to time, people submit images of organisms they are unfamiliar with. Those images are posted here for viewers to identify. Can you identify any of these organisms? If you can, please e-mail the name(s) to info@vfthomas.com This is not a contest.

When one of these organisms is properly identified, (1) the answer will be posted, (2) a link to the image will be added to the appropriate Champlain Project checklist, and (3) after a month or so, the image will be removed from this web page. Thank you for any help you can offer.






This dragonfly was seen near Somes Pond in the Somes-Meynell Sanctuary, in Mount Desert, on 31 May 2010.





This dragonfly was seen in a field north of the seasonal portion of the Seal Cove Road, in Southwest Harbor, on 12 June 2010.





This dragonfly was seen along the carriage road between Eagle Lake parking area and carriage road intersection 4, in Bar Harbor, on 15 June 2011.





This odonate was seen on the Bass Harbor Marsh in Tremont on 29 June 2010.





This beetle was seen on the Higgins Farm Road, Blagden Preserve (The Nature Conservancy) in Bar Harbor on 30 May 2010. The submitter of the photo writes: "After consulting the Audubon Field Guide to North American Insects and Spiders, I think this is a female Horned (or Forked?) Fungus Beetle. Aprox. 1/2" long or a bit less. Looks like a miniature cross between an armored tank and a dinosaur. Nadav, age 5, pointed this one out to me near the parking lot, at the end of our walk, and asked me to 'camera' it."
*****Thank you to Lynn Havsall (of Firefly Farm) for her identification of this as an "Eastern Ironclad Beetle, Phellopsis obcordata. They are really cool! Fun to play with. Often covered in schmutz. They eat bracket fungi, often on birch." (Contact Lynn at lhavsall@gmail.com for information about subscribing to her weekly "Nature Notes".)





This beetle was seen in a rural section of Bar Harbor on 4 May 2010. The submitter of the photo writes: "The yellow was brighter in 'real life'. I had to wash out the color in order to get more definition on the spots."





This beetle was seen in a rural section of Bar Harbor on 4 May 2010. The submitter of the photo writes: "Like an idiot I let this thing go so I could come in and download the photo and get the Field Guide to N.A. Insects & Spiders. Please tell me I did not release a Ribbed Pine Borer (Rhagium inquisitor)."





This beetle was on a house in a rural section of Bar Harbor in early April 2010. The submitter of the photo writes: "This looks like Lucidota atra (Lampyridae), to me, after checking on-line photos. My observation: it is diurnal, and appears to be more active when the sun is not behind a cloud. The website descriptions say that it does not luminesce but uses pheronomes to attract its mate. Wouldn't that be disappointing, to be born a firefly and then be one of those that doesn't 'glow' in the dark? Actually, the wings/body, although very dark and not shiny, have the quality of ashphalt shingles, a sort of subdued gritty-glitter, so the beetle has some textural interest even if it doesn't light up."

 



This cocoon(?) was on a house in a rural section of Bar Harbor in early April 2010.





This fungus is growing on a stump along the Jesup Path in Bar Harbor.